Surname: McKee

Early Life in Colorado

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Title Page for Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Story County, Iowa

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Story County, Iowa

The full manuscript contains a condensed history of the state of Iowa, a number of biographies of distinguished citizens of the state of Iowa, a descriptive history of Story county and 229 selected biographical sketches of the citizens of Story County, Iowa.

The Meeting of Folsom and Nittakachih

When the council, convened for the adjustment and final distribution of the annuity, adjourned in such confusion, together with the animosity manifested and openly expressed by both contending parties the one toward the other, (a similar scene never before witnessed in a Choctaw council) I feared the consequences that I was apprehensive would follow; but hoped that the conflicting opinions then agitating my people would be harmonized upon calm reflection and the adoption of wise and judicious measures. But when I ascertained that Nittakachih and Amosholihubih were truly assembling their warriors, I began to view the matter in its true

Peter Perkins Pitchlynn was the Choctaw Principal Chief from 1864-1866

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew Jackson,

Treaty of August 20, 1851

TREATY MADE AND CONCLUDED AT CAMP LU-PI-YU-MA, AT CLEAR LAKE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 20, 1851, BETWEEN REDICK McKEE, INDIAN AGENT ON THE PART OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE CHIEFS, CAPTAINS AND HEAD MEN OF THE CA-LA-NA-PO, HA-BI-NA-PO, ETC., ETC., TRIBES OF INDIANS. A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Camp Lu-pi-yu-ma, on the south side of Clear Lake, between Redick McKee, one of the Indian agents specially appointed to make treaties with the various Indian tribes in California, on the part of the United States, and the under-signed chiefs, captains and head men of the

Slave Narrative of Jenny McKee

Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Jenny McKee Location: London, Kentucky Age: (about) 85 Mrs. Jenny McKee, of color, who lives just North of London can tell many interesting things of her life. “Aunt Jenny” as she is called, is about eighty-five years of age, and says she thinks she is older than that as she can remember many things of the slave days. She tells of the old “masters” home and the negro shacks all in a row behind the home. She has a scar on her forehead received when she was pushed by one of the other little slaves,

Biography of Thomas H. McKee

Thomas H. McKee is a representative of farming interests in Dover Township, his home being near Burlington. It was in that Township that he was born, May 16, 1854, his parents being James and Rebecca (Wilson) McKee. The father was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1808 and the mother in Donegal, Ireland, in 1839. In early life they came to the new world and were married in Dover Township, Racine County, where their remaining days were passed, the father’s death occurring in 1873, while the mother survived until 1909. At the time of his arrival the country was wild and

Biography of Leonard V. McKee

Leonard V. McKee. The life, the personal character and the influence of Leonard V. McKee impressed themselves strongly upon the formative period of Marshall County’s history. He was founder and president of the Frankfort State Bank, was a large land owner and one of the leading business men and citizens of the community. He was born in Allen County, Ohio, August 18, 1845, and died at his home in Frankfort, Kansas, December 22, 1916, aged seventy-one years, four months and four days. His parents, Robert and Sarah (Dunlap) McKee, were both natives of Ohio. His father was a cabinet maker

Biography of Ralph M. McKee

Ralph M. McKee is superintendent of the consolidated city schools at Neal in Greenwood County. He is one of the younger men engaged in educational work in Kansas, and had a highly creditable record for the work he had already done and stands high both among his fellow teachers and in his home community. Mr. McKee was born at Xenia, Ohio, December 1, 1893. His McKee ancestors were early settlers in America. Mr. McKee had strains of English and Irish ancestry, and inherits good qualities through both lines. His father, W. T. McKee, was born in Ohio in 1861, and