Fisher

Norton Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Capt. Steven Norton and family occupied the Ray-Stevens-Norton place after Mr. Stevens for some years, just how many the writer cannot state. He was a sea captain, born in the town of St. George, Me., March 22, 1789; came to Blue Hill, where he continued to make his home until his death Jan. 6, 1873, aged nearly eighty-six years. He commanded coasting vessels between the town and Boston until age and infirmities compelled him to retire from a sea life. Captain Norton was twice married— first Jan. 18, 1813, to Mehitable, daughter of Andrew and Mehitable Kimball Witham, born Aug. 28, 1797; she died July 10, 1835, leaving ten children. On Nov. 27, 1835, he married, second, Clarissa Carleton, daughter of William and Pamelia (Osgood) Carleton, born Feb. 7, 1813; died Nov. 17, 1873, aged sixty years and eight months. She also bore ten children, so that by two wives there were twenty as follows: By first wife: Mary, John, Stephen, William, Mehitable, Sophia, Priscilla, Frederick, Catherine and Lois. By second wife: Harriet, Hollis, Clara, Francis, Granville, Clara, Mehitable, Stephen, Ann and John. Beside these John Havlin was an adopted son of the family.

History of Littleton New Hampshire

The History of Littleton New Hampshire is comprised of three volumes, two volumes of history, and a final volume of genealogies. Considered one of the best examples of local history written in the early 20th century, is your ancestors resided in Littleton then you need these books. Read and download for free!

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry …

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Fisher Genealogical History

This manuscript starts with Sebastian Fisher, a native of Germany, with his wife Susanna and their two small children, embarked for England at Rotterdam, Holland, on July 28, 1708. The family came with the intention of settling on land in the Schoharie Valley in New York, but found on arrival that they did not hold legal tender to the land, since the land was not first purchased from the Native Americans. Sebastian then moved with other German immigrants who had also purchased land to the Tulpehocken Valley of Pennsylvania, where he settled his family. The 76 pages of the manuscript take some of the descendants of Sebastian and Susanna Fisher into the 20th century.

Hawes Family of Wrentham, MA

For generations, since the early Colonial period, the Hawes family has been resident in Wrentham, Mass. The line is traced back to Edward Hawes, of Dedham, Mass., born probably about 1620, who died in 1686. He married April 15, 1648, Eliony Lombard. This genealogy discusses the line from Edward through Oliver Snow Hawes who removed to Fall River Mass. It then discusses the family and descendants of Olvier Snow Hawes who resided in the vicinity of Fall River.

Caroline C. Todd Cunningham of Elyria OH

CUNNINGHAM, Caroline C. Todd7, (Marvin6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 2, 1824, in Martins-burgh, N. Y., died Sept. 3, 1907, married Sept. 18, 1850, Myron H. Cunningham, who was born Sept. 20, 1823, in Lancaster, Erie County, N. Y., he is now (1912) living in Elyria, Ohio. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary …

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1910 Census of Fort Shaw Industrial Indian School

Fort Shaw Industrial Indian Boarding School opened in 1891 in Montana. It was discontinued 30 June 1910, due to declining enrollment. In 1904, it had a famous girls’ basketball team that barnstormed its way to St. Louis playing basketball and performing, and won the “World Championship” at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. This census …

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