Dean

Hartshorne-Hartshorn Family of Taunton, Massachussetts

One branch of the earlier Reading Hartshorne family, and the one to which this article is more especially directed, found its way into what is now the town of Foxboro, Mass., and a later generation removed to Taunton, Mass., where the name has long been representative of substantial men and women and useful citizenship. Reference is made to some of the posterity of Jeremiah Hartshorne, who was of Foxboro prior to the Revolution, and maybe the Jeremiah whom records of Reading show connected with lengthy service in that struggle. Notably at Taunton have lived and figured in its social and business life the late Charles Warren and George F., sons of the late Jesse Hartshorne, and of a still later generation the late George Trumbull Hartshorne, a liberally educated gentleman, who for a period was an instructor in his alma mater – Harvard – and later an analytic chemist of his native city, in fine, a cultured gentleman prominent in the social life of Taunton.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the …

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George C. Dean

The Deans of Cornish have descended from James Dean of Conn., who was a soldier of the Revolution, serving through the whole war. Was with Gen. Washington at Valley Forge during the memorable winter of 1777-78. Lived to the age of 102 years and died in Vt. Had six children. Among them was: Elkanah2, b. …

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Biography of Purl Dean

PURL DEAN. In the personnel of the live business men of the thriving town of Summitville, Indiana, Mr. Dean, of the well known firm of Dean & Tomlison, stands for progress, aggressiveness and honesty in the execution of his business interests, He is known in Madison County as possessed of rare business acumen, which is …

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Dean, Lela – Obituary

On Wednesday of last week, Lela the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Matt Dean, of Sanger, died at the residence of Dr. J.M. Boyd of Baker City. The many friends of the bereaved parents will sympathize with them in their loss of their infant. Eastern Oregon Republican, Thursday July 28, 1889

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry …

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Brookfield Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Brookfield Massachusetts.

French Genealogy of Fall River Massachusetts

The Fall River French family here considered springs from the early Rehoboth family of the name, and it, as will be observed further on, according to Savage, perhaps from the Dorchester family. John French, the head of the Dorchester family and the immigrant ancestor, was a native of England, born in 1612. He had land granted him at what became Braintree for five heads Feb. 24, 1639-40. He was admitted to the church in the adjoining town of Dorchester, Jan. 27, 1642, and the births of his first two children are recorded in Dorchester. He became a freeman May 29, 1639. He was active and prominent among the early settlers. His son John was born Feb. 28, 1641.

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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