Surname: Brearley

Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor Connecticut

Some Descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut

Title: Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut, with lineage of families allied by marriage Author: Mildred Gertrude Rowley Crankshaw Publication date: 1961-1965 Publisher: Digitizing sponsor: Internet Archive Contributor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Repository Internet Archive Read Book Download PDF Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor. Thomas Rowley. Thomas Rowley (Rowell) a cordwainer, was in Windsor Connecticut as early as 1662, and Simsbury Connecticut by 1670. He died 1 May, 1705/8, estate inventory dated 1 May 1708. Married at Windsor, 5 May, 1669 by Rev. Wolcott, Mary Denslow, daughter of Henry, Windsor, born 10 Aug. 1651,

Surrender of Santa Anna

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

Country Home of Augustus Pierre Chauteau

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors. 1Many tributaries of Arkansas River originally bore French names. There was the Fourche La Feve named for a French family [Thwaites, R. G., editor, Early Western Travels, vol. xiii, 156]; the Petit

Fort Gibson in 1875

Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller 1James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the array as major in 1808, became Lieutenant-colonel in 1810, and

Biography of Mrs. Lucinda J. Brearley

In a history of the settlement of a state there is usually but slight reference made to the part which the women have taken in its development. This is, of course, due to the more active connection of the pioneer men with public life, while the wives, mothers and daughters are concerned in the duties of home making. Great credit, however, is due the brave pioneer women, who stand courageously by the side of husbands and fathers, sharing with them in the hardships and dangers which accompany the development of a new section; nor is their influence a minor factor