Blake

Muster Roll of Captain Joseph Anthony’s Company of Infantry

Muster Roll of Captain Joseph Anthony’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the nineteenth day of April, 1839, when mustered.

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Genealogy of John Howe of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts

The compilation of this Howe Family Genealogy is due to the researches of Judge Daniel Wait Howe of Indianapolis, Indiana. Begun many years ago, the greater part of the work was done by him and under his supervision. It proved to be a stupendous task and involved much labor and expense. Originating in a desire to make a short record for his children, the work gradually expanded, taking in all known descendants of John How of Sudbury and Marlborough and later welcoming with equal care and research the other lines; and, in fact, all material relating to the name of Howe.

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Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twentieth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Bangor, Maine, to the eleventh day of May, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Governor Houston’s Life Among the Indians

The year following his failure to secure the contract, Houston spent writing letters defending his acts and denouncing the officials who had been discharged. In addition to the Indian officials, he poured his wrath and denunciation on Colonel Hugh Love, a trader on the Verdigris whom Houston accused of being in league with the Indian Agent to rob the Creeks; Love replied to Houston with some spirited charges against the latter. Stung by the contents of an article appearing in a Nashville paper, in a burst of passion Houston gave to the press of Nashville a most intemperate letter, July 13, 1831, beginning:

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Wilson and Allied Families: Billew, Britton, Du Bois, Longshore, Polhemus, Stillwell, Suebering

William Wilson, the pioneer ancestor of this family, emigrated from Stewardstown, County of Tyrone, Ireland, in 1732, when 19 years of age. The Town of Stewardstown is in the parish of Donagheny in the province of Ulster and eighty-two miles northwest of Dublin, long noted for its very superior linen cloth.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Descendants of William Sturdy of Attleboro MA and Slatersville RI

William Sturdy, as he was thenceforth known, then shipped on an American schooner lying at Leghorn, and bound for the United States. He finally landed at Beverly, Mass., June 9, 1809. From the port of Beverly he made several voyages as mate of American schooners, but finally abandoned the seas. He married in Beverly Clarissa Whittemore, who was born in that town Jan. 28, 1794. After their marriage they settled in Attleboro, Bristol county, where Mr. Sturdy bought land lying on the west shore of the Falls pond and engaged in farming until 1827. Here ten of his fourteen children were born. About that time, 1827, “the initial efforts in cotton manufacturing on the Blackstone had opened the way for the employment of minors,” and Mr. Sturdy availed himself of this opportunity because it had become impossible for him to procure a proper subsistence for his large family from his farm. In that year he sold out and removed to the Blackstone Valley, locating at Slatersville, town of North Smithfield, R. I., where he and his children found employment in the cotton mills. He later settled in Blackstone, Mass., where he died Oct. 16, 1834. He was a hardworking man, honest and upright in his dealings, and his large family of fourteen children reflected great credit on their home training. The wife and mother died Feb. 13, 1856.

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Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

In New Mexico, which became a part of the United States territory at the same time as California, the Indians are numerous and far more formidable than those farther west. The Apache Indians and Navajo Indians are the most powerful tribes west of the Mississippi. Being strong, active, and skillful, war is their delight, and they were the terror of the New Mexicans before the territory was occupied by the United States troops. The Pueblo Indians are among the best and most peaceable citizens of New Mexico. They, early after the Spanish conquest, embraced the forms of religion and the manners and customs of their then more civilized masters. The Pimos and Maricopos are peaceable tribes who cultivate the ground and endeavor to become good citizens. They are much exposed to the irresistible attacks of the Apache Indians and Navajo Indians, and, very often, the fruits of their honest toil become the plunder of those fierce wanderers.

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B Surnames – Walpole Massachusetts Marriage Records to 1850

BABBITT, Betsey and Samuel G. Clap, Mar. 8, 1843. Sarah P., 21, d. Willard and S., and Luther Hayward, widower [publishment of intention of marriage, omits widower], May 29, 1848. Sophia and George Copeland, Apr. 10, 1842. BACON, Alfred of Dover, and Harriett Perry, Nov. 27, 1834. Anna of Dedham, and William Kindall 1st, publishment

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