Surname: Baxter

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next

High School Building, Norwich Village, Erected in 1898

History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of persons

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected

First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield,

Mount Olive Cemetery, Cass County, Illinois

Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery, Cass County, Illinois

The Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery is located about halfway (approx. 7 miles each way) between Chandlerville and Oakford, Illinois. It is located at the intersection of the Chandlerville-Oakford Road and Pontiac Road. Look for Mt. Olive Baptist Church. This is a transcription of the cemetery.

Letter from John Baxter to Robert Love

Knoxville, Tennessee. My Dear Sir: September 2nd, 1861 Your letter of the 29th July did not reach me before I left for Richmond. What detained it I do not know. But on my return I received and read it with great interest. By it, I see that you had properly appreciated my position. From what I had heard, you had misconceived my views, but I seen now that you had not. With the strongest possible convictions against the policy and propriety of Secession, I have ever exerted by influence to preserve peace in East Tennessee, and, as I think, with

Hodgen Cemetery, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

To get to Hodgen Cemetery take Hwy #59 south from the main intersection in Hodgen about 1/2 mi, then right. This is the cemetery for the town of Hodgen, and still active. Our thanks to Paula Doyle-Bicket for the submission of these cemeteries to our online collection. [box]Source: Copyright © 2004, by Paula Doyle-Bicket. All Rights Reserved[/box]

Biography of Alexander B. Baxter

Alexander Brown Baxter, chief of police, and Colonel of the 24th Battalion volunteer infantry, was born in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, June 7, 1831, his parents being Alexander and Elizabeth (Hogg) Baxter. His father was Lieutenant in the 25th and 43rd infantry; served in the Light Division of the army (under the Duke of Wellington), in Spain; and twice in the invasion of France, in the Netherlands and Ireland, and was rewarded with a medal for his services. He retired on half pay after the battle of Waterloo, but was subsequently appointed second oldest Captain of the Venezuela regiment

Biography of Jacob Baxter, M. D., M. P. P.

Jacob Baxter, who has represented Haldimand in the Provincial Legislature since the Dominion was formed, is a son of Jacob and Susan (Hershey) Baxter, both natives of Canada, and was born in the Township of Bertie, County of Welland, June 6, 1832. He is a grandson of John Baxter, who emigrated from Ireland near the close of the 18th century, settled in Bertie, and was a captain in the war of 1812-14, being in the battle of Fort Erie, and other engagements. The wounded at Fort Erie were taken to the barn of Captain Baxter, four miles away, to have

Biographical Sketch of J. F. Baxter

J. F. Baxter, station agent and conductor, was born at Sidney Plain, N.Y., in 1833; moved to Rockford, Ill., in 1851 and engaged in mercantile business. In 1861 he moved to Wheatland, Ia.; thence to Marshalltown, in 1874, and in September, 1879, came to Sac City and took charge of the depot. He makes two trips a day as conductor, and during his absence the depot is charge of Frank L. Stayner, operator. Mr. Baxter is agent for the American express company.