Genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts

This is the genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts proving descent from Alfred the Great, King of England.

ALFRED THE GREAT, KING OF ENGLAND, father of:
PRINCESS ETHELWIDA: m. Baldwin II, Count of Flanders. Their son was:
JOHN DE BURGO: Earl Comyn, Baron Tourburgh.
HARLOWEN DE BURGO: who had:
ROBERT DE BuRGO: Earl of Cornwall and Moreton.
WILLIAM DE BURGH DE MORETON: Earl of Cornwall, who rebelled against Henry II, and had his eyes plucked out by his order.
JOHN DE BURGH: who had:
HUBERT DE BURGH: Earl of Kent; Chief Justice of England and Ireland and guardian of King Henry III; d. 1243.
SIR JOHN, BARON DE BURGH: m. Lady Hawise, dau. of one of 25 Magna Charta barons.
JOHN DE BURGH: Baron of Lanvallei.
LADY HAWYSE DE BURGH: m. Robert, Baron de Greslei, d. 1283.
LADY JOANE DE GRESLEI: m. Sir John de la Warre.
LADY CATHERINE DE LA WARRE: m. Sir Warine le Latimer, Knt.
LADY ELIZABETH LATIMER: m. Sir Thos. Griffin, Knt., of Northampton.
RICHARD GRIFFIN: m. Anne Chamberlain.
SIR NICHOLAS GRIFFIN: of Braybrooke, Sheriff of Nottinghamshire.
LADY CATHERINE GRIFFIN: m. (first) Sir John Digby.
WILLIAM DIGBY: of Kettleby; M. Rose Perwich.
SIMON DIGBY: of Bedale, Ruthlandshire.
EVERARD DIGBY: m. Catherine, dau. of Magister Strockbridge de Vandershaff Theodore de Newkirk.
ELIZABETH DIGBY: b. 1584, d. 165-; m. Enoch Lynde, of London.
JUDGE SIMON LYNDE: of Boston, Mass.; b. 1624, d. 1687; came to New England in 1650; m., 1653, Hannah, dau. of John Newdigate, of London. Among their ch. was:
MARY LINDE: m. 1792, John Valentine, of Boston, “His Majesty’s AdvocateGeneral for the Province of Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, and Colony of Rhode Island”.
SAMUEL VALENTINE: of Hopkinton; m. Elizabeth Jones. One of their ch. was:
MARY VALENTINE: m. Elijah Fitch of Lewiston, Me.
EMILY S. FITCH: m. EDWARD D. BAKER, of Salem, Mass.

  1. MARY FITCH BAKER
  2. HANNAH FITCH BAKER
  3. BENJAMIN F. BAKER, of Hopkinton. Issue.
  4. EDWARD HENRY BAKER, of Chicago. Issue.

Surnames:
Baker,

Collection:

1 thought on “Genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts”

  1. I’m doing some work on the ancestry of Hubert de Burgh at the moment and have some comments:
    ALFRED THE GREAT, KING OF ENGLAND, father of:
    PRINCESS ETHELWIDA: m. Baldwin II, Count of Flanders. (this will be Ælfthryth, Countess of Flanders) Their son was:
    JOHN DE BURGO: Earl Comyn, Baron Tourburgh. (Ælfthryth and Baldwin did not have a son called John de Burgo. “Earl” was an Anglo-Saxon title and wasn’t used in France or Flanders. “Comyn” appears to relate to a later family that is not related. There was no such title as “Baron Tourburgh”, nor is there such a place in France or Flanders.)
    HARLOWEN DE BURGO: who had: (this is actually Herluin de Conteville, he was never called “de Burgh”)
    ROBERT DE BuRGO: Earl of Cornwall and Moreton. (This is actually Robert Count of Mortain, he was never called “de Burgo”.)
    WILLIAM DE BURGH DE MORETON: Earl of Cornwall, who rebelled against Henry II, and had his eyes plucked out by his order. (This is William of Mortain, Earl of Cornwall, he was never called “de Burgh”.)
    JOHN DE BURGH: who had: (It is likely that William of Mortain did not have any children.)
    HUBERT DE BURGH: Earl of Kent; Chief Justice of England and Ireland and guardian of King Henry III; d. 1243. (It is possible that Hubert’s father was called either William or Walter, there is no evidence for who the grandparents were, but they were minor landowners. The family was from a village in Norfolk called Burgh-next-Aylsham, the family took their name from the village.)
    SIR JOHN, BARON DE BURGH: m. Lady Hawise, dau. of one of 25 Magna Charta barons. (This is correct).
    The above family tree for the de Burghs appears to have been based on work by Sir Bernard Burke and others that has now been shown to be incorrect.
    Best regards
    Stephen Burke

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