Essex County MA

The Descendants of Thomas White of Marblehead

Thomas White is the first generation. His descendants who bear the family name stand in numerical order from himself to NO. 79. Small figures at the end of a name, thus, “THOMAS2″ indicate the generation to which the individual belongs. Figures in parentheses placed before a name, forming the subject of a distinct notice, thus, …

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Biographical Sketch of Lawrence D. Bailey, Judge

Judge Lawrence D. Bailey, long a resident of Emporia and the pioneer lawyer of Southwestern Kansas, also accomplished much in forwarding the agricultural interests of the state. He was a New Hampshire man, born at Sutton, Merrimack County, August 26, 1819. He was of an old Euglish manufacturing family, and his American ancestors are said …

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Ayer Family Genealogy of Buxton Maine

The ancestors of the Ayer families in the state, were early settled at Haverhill, Mass., and from that town came the Ayers of Biddeford and Buxton. John was at Salisbury, 1640; at Ipswich, 1648; died at Haverhill, 1657, leaving numerous descendants. Peter Ayer was admitted freeman at Haverhill, 1666; chosen representative, 1683-85-89-90. Robert and Thomas …

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First and Second Churches in Marblehead Massachusetts

The first church in Marblehead was built in 1649. “From the earliest records of this town, it appears that as early as 1648, when ‘the Planta­tion,’ as it was called, contained forty-four families, there was preaching among them by Mr. Walton.” “Mr. Walton continued to officiate as a public teacher, though without ordination, about twenty …

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

1742-3 Byfield Massachusetts Parish Records Baptisms

Mark, son of Jonathan Thurlo, Jan. 2. Jonathan, son of Jonathan Layton, Jan. 16, 1742-3 Samll, son of David Boynton, Feb. 6 Abigail, dau. of Jer. Adams, Feb. 6. David, son of Caleb Burbank, Feb. 13, 1742-3 Mary, dau. of Jeremiah Poor, Feb. 13, 1742-3 Mary, dau. of Edmund Cheney, jr., Mar. 6, 1742-3

Biography of Henry Harrison Edwards

Henry Harrison Edwards, a watchmaker of acknowledged ability, who is now residing in Allenstown, was born in Laconia, N.H., July 28, 1840, son of Nathaniel and Rachel (Ranlett) Edwards. His grandfather, Ebenezer Edwards, who in his earlier years followed the sea, subsequently learned the hatter’s trade, and followed it in Laconia for many years. Another …

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Biographical Sketch of Osgood McFarland

Osgood McFarland, a son of Major Moses McFarland, of the revolutionary war, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, together with his wife, Mary Bartlett, came to town from Haverhill, Mass., in 1809. A few years afterwards he removed to Marietta, Ohio. He remained there seven years, when, on account of his health, he returned to Vermont, driving his …

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