Location: Toledo Ohio

Roots in Birmingham

Roots in Birmingham

Roots in Birmingham is a compilation of interviews with Birmingham residents, evoking the neighborhood’s history and culture. A “Birmingham Cultural Center Book” Stories collected from Judy (Farkas) Balogh, Elizabeth “Kardy”(Kordas) Boray, Anna (Potoczki) Fabos, John Gocsik, Father Martin Hernady, Margaret “Peg”(v) Horvath, Nancy (Packo) Horvath, Lillian (Kertz) Keil, William Kertesz, Mary (Christian) King, Mariska Kinsey-LaCava, Eleanor (Weizer) Mesteller, Don and Barb Nyitray, John Oravec, Paul John Slovak, William Szabo, Steven Tarczali, Barbara (Priscsak) Torok, Alberta (Taylor) Traylor, Magdalene Ujvagi, Peter Ujvagi, Pete Vas, Jr. and Martha (Boden) Young.

Birmingham - reflections on community

Birmingham: reflections on community

This book is the second volume of a collaborative project called “Birmingham Remembers” Residents of the Birmingham neighborhood had been interviewed in the 1980s. With this project the participants comments are organized by topic. Topics include heritage, education, religion, work, recreation, neighborhood, rituals, holidays, the Great Depression, military service, the Hungarian Revolution, activism and reminiscences.”

George Mitchell Hooper

Ancestors of George Mitchell Hooper of Bridgewater, MA

The Hooper family, to which belonged the late George Mitchell Hooper, one of Bridgewater’s well-known citizens, is an old and distinguished one in New England. George Mitchell Hooper, son of Mitchell, was born in the town of Bridgewater Sept. 1, 1838. He received his education in the public schools and Bridgewater Academy, later attending Peirce Academy and the State normal school at Bridgewater, graduating from the latter institution in 1857. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for one year and then began the manufacture of brick with his father, a business in which he engaged for half a century. He was also a surveyor. He was identified with the banking interests of Bridgewater, having been one of the trustees of the Bridgewater Savings Bank, also filling the office of clerk. He was clerk and treasurer of the Bridgewater Cemetery Association; a member of the Plymouth County Agricultural Association, of which for years he was treasurer, and was secretary; and trustee of the Memorial Public Library. He died July 2, 1909, in his seventy-first year. On Oct. 16, 1861, Mr. Hooper was married to Mary E. Josselyn, who was born at Hanson, Mass., daughter of Hervey and Elizabeth (Howland) Josselyn. She died Jan. 30, 1884, and was buried in Mount Prospect cemetery. Eight children were born of this marriage.

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North

Slave Narrative of Julia King

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Julia King Date of Interview: June 10, 1937 Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Residence: 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Age: (about) 80 K. Osthimer, Author Folklore: Stories From Ex-Slaves Lucas County, Dist. 9 Toledo, Ohio The Story of MRS. JULIA KING of Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Julia King resides at 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Although the records of the family births were destroyed by a fire years ago, Mrs. King places her age at about eighty years. Her husband, Albert King, who died two years ago, was the first Negro policeman employed on the Toledo

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Hannah Davidson

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Hannah Davidson Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Mrs. Hannah Davidson occupies two rooms in a home at 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Born on a plantation in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, she is today a little, white haired old lady. Dark, flashing eyes peer through her spectacles. Always quick to learn, she has taught herself to read. She says, “I could always spell almost everything.” She has eagerly sought education. Much of her ability to read has been

Biography of William Harry Little, M. D.

William Harry Little, M. D. The community of Alta Vista in Wabaunsee County had had the capable services of Doctor Little as a physician for more than fifteen years. In connection with his large practice Doctor Little also conducts the leading drug store of the village. Doctor Little is a native of Ohio, but had spent most of his life in Kansas. He was born in Lucas County, near the City of Toledo, November 5, 1868. He is of colonial American stock, originally from Scotland. His people were early settlers in Pennsylvania and pioneers in the State of Ohio. His