Hancock County ME

Grant Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

The next place and house was that of Francis Grant, who came from the Kennebec and married Mercy Gray, Sept. 2, 1812. He gained his livelihood by farming and fishing and the children were: Thomas, Moses, George, Lydia, Francis and Mercy. Mention is also made of Francis’ brother, Isaac.

Bartlett Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

John Bartlett was born at Mt. Desert in the early years of 1800, married Mary Hale, of Sedgwick, July 27, 1826, and set up housekeeping upon Long Island. Their children were: Caroline, George, mary, Frederick, Vienna, John, Nancy, Hiram and James.

Carter Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

I find it disappointing in the wonderful manuscript of R. A. F. Candage that he failed to provide any substance on the progenitor of the Carter family in Blue Hill, James Carter, Sr. What we can gather, is James arrived in Blue Hill about 1770 from Edgecomb Maine with his young family and settled at the location known later as the Carter Places. He had at least the following children: James and David. The offspring of both James and David are much more thoroughly on this page.

Colburn Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Charles Colburn was a sailor in his younger days; he was born in the town of Billerica, Mass., and came to Blue Hill previous to 1829. He married Serena Parker, daughter of Marble and Hannah (Lovejoy) Parker, Oct. 15, 1829. The children of Charles and Serena Colburn were as follows: Hannah, Eliza, Charles and Mary.

Parker Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Peter Parker, Sr., came from Andover, Mass., to Blue Hill Maine in 1765. He was a brother of Col. Nathan and Robert Parker, and was born at Andover Jan. 8, 1741; married Phebe Marble June 5, 1766. She was born July 29, 1744; died Oct. 1, 1805. He died October 24, 1822, aged eighty-one years, ten months and twenty-three days. Their children were as follows: Phebe, Serena, Peter, Hannah, Susannah, Marble, Mary, Isaac and Joanna.

The Old Schoolhouse of Blue Hills Maine

The Old Schoolhouse, the next building upon the road, stood upon a ledge at the left corner of what is now the shore road to Parker’s Point. It was an old-style square structure with square roof, unpainted and ancient-looking, that had been moved from beyond Bragdon’s brook, its first location, about 1830 or 1831. The author details a long held secret of how the old schoolhouse in Blue Hill Maine caught fire.

Leighton Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

About 1760, two brothers, Thomas and Samuel Leighton, came from Falmouth to this River. Samuel settled on the lot now in possession of Richard P. Willey. His sons were Theodore Leighton, Isaac Leighton, Parritt Leighton and Phineas Leighton. Thomas Leighton, the brother of Samuel Leighton, settled upon a lot at the head of Pigeon Hill Bay. He had a family of six sons and five daughters. Robert, Joseph, Thomas, Annie, Molly, James, Ross, Abigail, Betsey, Sarah and Benjamin. Nearly at the same time that Thomas and Samuel Leighton came and settled, Thomas Leighton 2d came from Dover, N. H., to Gouldsboro. His wife was Lydia Tracy. It is not known that there was any relationship between these two Thomas Leightons. From Gouldsboro, Thomas 2d soon removed to Steuben and settled upon the lot afterwards known as the Henry Leighton lot. He had ten children, Jonathan, Mark, Charity, Alexander, Hatevil, Pamelia, Isaiah, Daniel, Israel and Asa.

A History of Swan’s Island, Maine

Upon the very threshold of this historical sketch we find ourselves quite destitute of early public records for Swan’s Island. For over half a century from the settlement of this island until its organization as a plantation no municipal records were kept. But we are fortunate that H. W. Small saw purpose in bringing to light many private family records, old deeds showing what lots were occupied by the pioneer settlers; and written mutual agreements, which seem to have been often the result of arbitration on any disputed point where different claims to land conflicted with one another.

Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

Fort George, Castine, Maine

The little town of Castine, on the Penobscot River, Maine, is a favorite resort for summer visitors, who are attracted by its fine air, its abundance of seafood, and its accessibility to the interior of the country. These same considerations together with the fine strategic location of Castine Peninsula at the head of Penobscot Bay, …

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Bagaduce Tribe

Bagaduce Indians. Bagaduce is the name of the peninsula in Hancock County, Maine, on which Castine is situated. Purchas mentions Chebegnadose (n should probably be u) as a town in 1602-1609 on Penobscot River in Abnaki territory, with 30 houses and 90 men, which may be connected with the more modern name. It is also, …

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