Black Genealogy

Slave Narrative of Lewis Mundy of Hannibal, Missouri

Mundy, Lewis West Center Street Hannibal, Missouri Marion County, Missouri Lewis Mundy, now living on West Center Street, Hannibal, Missouri, was born in slavery on the farm of John Wright, five miles north of La Belle, Lewis County, Missouri. He has lived there for over thirty years, and has a wide acquaintance among both white …

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Slave Narrative of Henry Dant of Hannibal, Missouri

Henry Dant, now living with his daughter on Davis Street in Hannibal, was born in slavery on the farm of Judge Daniel Kendrick, south of Monroe City in Ralls County. He is about one hundred and five years old, in possession of all his faculties and is able to move around the house. He seemed to have only hazy recollections, and it was difficult to keep him from wandering from the subject. The following is the story that he told.

Slave Narrative of Clay Smith of Hannibal, Missouri

Clay (Carrie) Smith, now living at 612 Butler Street, Hannibal, Missouri, was born in slavery shortly before the Civil War on the farm of Joe Maupin about five miles west of Hannibal. Her present residence on Butler Street is part of the way up the hill overlooking Mark Twain Avenue (formerly Palmyra Avenue) and facing …

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Slave Narrative of William Black of Hannibal, Missouri

Black, William 919 South Arch Street Hannibal, Missouri Marion County, Missouri William Black of 919 South Arch Street, Hannibal, Missouri, is one of the few ex-slaves living in Marion County. He is now about eighty-five years old, and has lived his entire life in Marion, Monroe, and Ralls Counties. The following story is related by William …

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Baltimore Maryland City Directories 1799-1946

This page lists 109 free digitized directories found online for the city of Baltimore Maryland covering the years of 1799-1946 (incomplete). Directories can provide such information on an individual such as their employment and address during the year issued. They may also indicate whether they were renting or residing with somebody else at the time.

Cleveland County North Carolina Colored Apprentices

A list of Colored Apprentices that have been indentured in the County Court of Cleveland County since May 1866 Underage children who were not or could not be supported by their parents or were orphans were apprenticed by Freedmen’s Bureau officials to persons who would be responsible for their upbringing and welfare. North Carolina Cleveland …

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Cindy Henderson’s DNA Results

My mother is of Irish/German and Italian ancestry. Her father is a 1st generation Italian, the family is from Abruzzo Italy. The colonial line, her mother who is partially Irish/German was from Roane, TN. Her (grandmother) father’s family is from Old Fort McDowell NC. They moved to the Tennessee area. My father’s maternal line, his …

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Autauga County Alabama Records at ADAH

This database contains records from local, county and municipal offices, such as the probate office, tax assessor, and orphan’s court. Most of the original records remain in the originating office. The following results reflect the records available at the Alabama Department of Archives and History Center (ADAH) specifically for Autauga County. In order to view any of the following Autauga County Alabama records the researcher would need to visit the ADAH in person, or hire a researcher to perform the task for them, or visit the specific originating office for the record.

Register Of Marriages In The Parish Of Michilimackinac

The marriage records from the register at Michilimackinac are here provided as they were translated by Edward O. Brown back in 1889. The records of this register reflect the history of Michilimackinac as a trading post town. They show the transition from French to British to American control of the area, as well as the …

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Mackinac Marriage Records 1790-1799

January 21, 1792, I, the undervsigned Justice of the Peace, received the mutual Marriage Consent of Jean Baptiste La Borde dit Sans regret, and of marguerite Machar Chevalier, In the presence of the undersigned witnesses * * * Adhemar St Martin J. P.1 Alexis Laframboise; J. B. Barthe; C. Gaultier; Joseph Laframboise; J. B. la …

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Mackinac Marriage Records 1750-1759

February 1, 1750, I, the undersigned priest of the society of Jesus, performing the duties of parish priest, received the mutual marriage consent of Poncelet Batillo de Clermont, a soldier, son of the late Jean Batillo and of Marguerite Pierrot, of the parish of St Pierre de Mousar in Clarmontor, bishopric of Treves; and of …

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The Melungeons: The Resurrection of a Proud People

The year was 2005.  It was a time when the internet for me was rapidly evolving from a new-fangled medium on which to send communications and find romance to a serious research tool.   The Muscogee-Creek Nation had retained me to create an electronic book on the Native American history of the Southeast.1 This innovative book …

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Biographical Sketch of Crispus Attucks

Attucks, Crispus, An Indian-negro half-blood of Framingham, Mass., near Boston, noted as the leader and first person slain in the Boston massacre of Mar. 5, 1770, the first hostile encounter between the Americans and the British troops, and therefore regarded by historians as the opening fight of the great Revolutionary struggle. In consequence of the …

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Parsons and Abbott Roll

By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Tribe ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. The genealogical researcher who is able to locate an ancestor on this document is most fortunate, as it forms the basis for many other documents relating to Creek claims cases through the 1960’s.

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