Topic: Pawnee

The Tribes West of the Mississippi – Indian Wars

By treaties concluded by the agents of the United State government at different periods, nearly all of the Indian tribes have been induced to remove west of the Mississippi. Those who remain in the haunts of their fathers are chiefly converts to Christianity, and in a half civilized state. Many of the tribes have dwindled into insignificance, yet the few who remain are proud to maintain their distinctive appellation, and support the independence of their old clan. The most powerful and numerous tribes in the northwest are the Sioux, or Dacotahs, the Blackfeet, Crows, and Pawnees. A few of the

At the Sand Creek Massacre

General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel.

Kit Carson, His Life and Adventures – Indian Wars

The subject of this sketch, Christopher “Kit” Carson, was born on the 24th of December, 1809, in Madison County, Kentucky. The following year his parents removed to Howard County, Missouri, then a vast prairie tract and still further away from the old settlements.

Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

In New Mexico, which became a part of the United States territory at the same time as California, the Indians are numerous and far more formidable than those farther west. The Apache Indians and Navajo Indians are the most powerful tribes west of the Mississippi. Being strong, active, and skillful, war is their delight, and they were the terror of the New Mexicans before the territory was occupied by the United States troops. The Pueblo Indians are among the best and most peaceable citizens of New Mexico. They, early after the Spanish conquest, embraced the forms of religion and the manners and customs of their then more civilized masters. The Pimos and Maricopos are peaceable tribes who cultivate the ground and endeavor to become good citizens. They are much exposed to the irresistible attacks of the Apache Indians and Navajo Indians, and, very often, the fruits of their honest toil become the plunder of those fierce wanderers.

Treaty of August 6, 1848

Treaty with the Pawnees; articles of agreement and convention made this sixth day of August, A. D. 1848, at Fort Childs, near the head of Grand Island, on the south side of the Nebraska or Great Platte River, between Lieutenant-Colonel Ludwell E. Powell, commanding battalion Missouri Mounted Volunteers, en route to Oregon, in behalf of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men of the four confederated bands of Pawnees, viz: Grand Pawnees, Pawnee Loups, Pawnee Republicans, and Pawnee Tappage, at present residing on the south side of the Platte River. Article I.The confederated bands of the Pawnees hereby cede

Treaty of September 30, 1825

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Pawnee tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, head men and Warriors of said Pawnee tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe

Treaty of June 22, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Marhar tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties,

Treaty of June 20, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Republic, on the part and behalf of their tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the

Treaty of June 19, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pitavirate Noisy Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting

Treaty of June 18, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded, by and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Grand Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties