Surname: Whipple

Historical Association of Lowell Mass

Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving and the Lowell Manufacturing Company, by Samuel Fay Dana, Samuel L., Memoir of, by John O. Green Early Recollections of an Old Resident, by Josiah B. French East Chelmsford (now Lowell), Families Living in, in 1802, by Z. E. Stone Green, Benjamin, Biography of, by

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

Walkover Shoe

Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater MA

The Keith family of the region of country in and about the Bridgewaters, members of which have been most prominent and influential there from the beginning, is as ancient as are the settlements there. Bridgewater, as originally, was the first interior settlement in the Old Colony, the grant of the plantation being made in 1645, but the actual settlement was not commenced until after 1650, the first lots being taken up in the West Parish, and there the first house was built and the first improvements made, the proprietors and inhabitants practically all coming from Duxbury. From the ancient town

1899 Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts Directory Cover

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main

Reading The Wampums

Indian Wampums

The Indians, having no written language, preserved and handed down their history to future generations through tradition, much of which could have been obtained a century and a half ago, and even a century ago, which was authentic and would have added much to the interest of the history of the continent of which we boast as our inheritance, though obtained by the extermination of a race of people whose wonderful history, had it been obtained as it once could have been, would have been very interesting and beneficial to future generations, throwing its light back over ages unknown, connecting

News from New England – King Phillip’s War

Being a true and last account of the present Bloody Wars carried on betwixt the infidels, natives, and the English Christians, and converted Indians of New England, declaring the many dreadful battles fought betwixt them: As also the many towns and villages burnt by the merciless heathens. And also the true number of all the Christians slain since the beginning of that War, As it was sent over by a factor of New England to a merchant in London. Licensed Aug. 1. Roger L’Estrange. London. Printed for J. Corners, at the sign of the Black Raven in Duck-Lane, 1676. 1The

Tribute to Bishop Whipple by the Rev. J. J. Enmegahbowh

Gen. James Grant Wilson. Two men in this broad land of ours have won the noble title of the apostle to the Indians. It was first worn by Rev. John Elliott in the seventeenth century. The other was well known to this conference and well loved, Henry B. Whipple. This morning I received from Mrs. Whipple a letter, in which she gave me some touching details of her noble husband’s last hours and of his funeral, which more than 200 Chippewa Indians came to attend four days after his death, some coming more than a hundred miles to look once

Evelyn Todd of Adams MA

Evelyn Todd6, (Solomon5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 5, 1812, died Jan., 1904, married Mercy Rice. He was a shoemaker and a good one. He lived in Adams, Mass. Children: 903. George. 904. Frederick Solomon, m. and had four children, all of whom d. young. 905. Eveline, m. Reuben Whipple.

Biographical Sketch of Moses Whipple

MOSES WHIPPLE, son of Jacob Whipple, was born at Grafton, Mass., in 1733, and came to Croydon in 1766, bringing three sons, Thomas, Aaron and Moses, and one daughter, Jerusha. His was one of the first three families that cane to town. Having a complete mastery of his passions, well educated, intelligent, distinguished for energy and decision of character, warm-hearted, hospitable and generous to all, lie was well calculated to be-what he indeed was-a father to the town. It is said of him that, so great was the respect entertained for him by his townsmen, his word was law in

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Whipple

THOMAS WHIPPLE, son of Moses, married Thankful Powers, and settled at Charlestown, N. H., and raised up a large family. AARON married Matilda Cooper and settled in the south part of the town, near Coit Mountain, on the farm so long and so well occupied by his son MOSES WHIPPLE previous to his retirement to his present life of comparative leisure at the Flat. Aaron, “In fair round belly, with good capon lined,” relished a joke.