Surname: Shattuck

Watson Coat of arms

Descendants of Matthew Watson of Leicester, Massachusetts

Matthew Watson (d. 1720), of English lineage, married Mary Orr in 1695, and in 1718 the family immigrated from Ireland to Boston, Massachusetts and settled in Leicester, Massachusetts. Descendants and relatives lived in New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Nebraska, Rhode Island, California, Nevada, Michigan and elsewhere. Includes Watson, Armington, Bemis, Denny, Draper, Kent, Washburn, Bailey, Barnard, Belcher, Bent, Biscoe, Bolles, Breckenridge, Bright, Browning, Bryant, Bullock, Burrage, Dennis, Fisher, Foster, Green, Hayward, Hobbs, Hodgkins, Holman, Howard, Jenks, Jones, Kellogg, Kitchell, Knight, Lazelle, Livermore, Loring, Mason, Maynard, Munger, Patrick, Prouty, Remington, Reed, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Sadler, Sibley, Snow, Sprague, Stone, Studley, Symonds, Taitt, Thomas, Thompson, Trask, Tucker, Waite, Webster, Westcott, Wheeler, Whittermore, Wilson, Woods and related families.

Genealogy of the Goff Family of Attleboro, Mass.

MAJ. WILLIAM HUNT GOFF, one of Attleboro’s well known citizens and leading public men, is a native of the Old Bay State, born in the town of Rehoboth, April 10, 1845. He is a descendant of one of the oldest families of Rehoboth, where the Goffs have figured more or less prominently, as well as in the nearby towns in Rhode Island, since about 1720, the date of which there is record of the families of Richard and Samuel Goff. From these two men have sprung a number whose names have been written high on the roll of fame in

Edwin B. Macy at his Blacksmith Shop

Ancestors of Frederick Macy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Macy family of New Bedford is among the oldest and most prominent families of Nantucket, the name having been identified with the business interests of New Bedford for the past seventy years. The first American ancestor of the family was Thomas Macy, clothier merchant, who came, it is said, from the county of Wilts, England, and was in Newbury, Mass., a proprietor; he was a freeman of Sept. 6, 1639. He removed to Salisbury and was town officer and deputy. He removed about 1659 from there to Chilmark; his was the first family on Nantucket island. He was a

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to

Biographical Sketch of Eleazer Shattuck

Shattuck, Eleazer, Lincoln, South Starksboro p. o., for about thirty years a resident of South Starksboro V t., was born in Huntington, Chittenden county, Vt., on May 6, 1825. He was a son of Peter and Electa (Grundy) Shattuck. His mother was a daughter of David Grundy, a native of Brandon, Vt. Eleazer Shattuck was a blacksmith at Huntington, Vt., where he resided for many years. Peter and Electa, his parents, had several children — Frederick (deceased), Luman, Reuben, and Eleazer. Eleazer has been married twice. His first wife was Eliza ———-, a daughter of Ephraim ———-, of South Starksboro,

Biography of Hon. E. D. Shattuck

HON. E.D. SHATTUCK, – Judge Shattuck has been prominently connected with the public affairs of our state for more than thirty years, and is so closely identified with our interests and society as to be a distinctively representative man among us. His mental strength and clearness, combined with remarkable accuracy and absence of personal bias, have made his services of the highest value. He has ever maintained a peculiar coolness of judgement, and neither has been swayed by popular excitement nor has resorted to sensational methods to advance his own views or interests. He has ever been above suspicion of

Biographical Sketch of Moody Shattuck

Moody Shattuck settled in the northeastern part of the town in 1807, coming from Athens, Vt. He filled several of the first offices of the town, represented his townsmen in the legislature several times, and served in the battle of Plattsburgh, ranking as captain. His brother, Jeremiah, came to Waterville soon after he located here, and subsequently removed to this town, locating on road 14, where he followed the occupation of a farmer and shoemaker. Chauncey, a grandson of Moody, now resides in Waterville, on road 7, and Thomas W., the eighth child of Jeremiah, born in Belvidere, in 1812,

Biography of Martin Shattuck

Martin Shattuck, son of Randall and Mary Ann (Thomas) Shattuck, Randall being the youngest son of Moody, was born in this town in Feb. 5, 1842. Mr. Shattuck received his intellectual training at the common schools of Belvidere, but his practical education was derived from hard labor upon his father’s farm where he remained till he was twenty-two years of age, when he entered his cousin’s store at Waterville as clerk. After two years at Waterville he married and went home to reside. Mr. Shattuck married, Jan. 31, 1866, Meribah Esther Hyde, daughter of William and Betsey (Fuller) Wilbur of

Biography of Erasmus D. Shattuck

Judge E. D. Shattuck was born in Bakersfield, Franklin County, Vermont, December 31, 1824. He spent his boyhood and youth on a farm and was prepared for a collegiate course at Bakersfield Academy. In 1844 he entered Vermont University, pursued the full classical course and graduated in 1848. While in college he was dependent upon his own resources for means to prosecute his studies, and during vacations and some part of term time he taught school in the country or had private classes in the village. Notwithstanding these disadvantages and interruptions he completed the college course in the prescribed time