Surname: Seymour

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Over a period of many years Mrs. Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown, early member of Linares Chapter, D.A.R., collected genealogy of her forebears. It was her wish that her work be sent to the library of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. This collection was painstakingly copied, with some additions and corrections, maintaining the same general form as used in the original notes. Elizabeth’s family originated in England moving to New England in the 1600’s. Her family lines involve many of the early lines in Connecticut, Massachusets, and New Hampshire. The families are arranged mostly in alphabetical order, and contain information from a simple direct line descendancy, to more elaborate genealogy.

Major families researched include: Alverson, Arms, Arnold, Ballou, Barden, Barker, Barnard, Bassett, Belden, Benedict, Betts, Blakeslee, Blanchard, Bradstreet, Brigham, Bronson, Buckmaster, Bull, Butterfield, Carpenter, Clark, Clerke, Cooke, Coombs, Cornwall, Corbin, Curitss, Dickerman, Dickson, Doolittle, Downey, Dudley, Eastman, Easton, Errington, Evarts, Fairbank, Foote, Gilbert, Goodrich, Graves, Gregory, Groves, Hale, Hand, Hall, Hawkes, Hawkins, Hills, Holmes, Hopkins, Hoyt, Huitt, Hurd, Keayne, Keene, Lockwood, Lupton, Lord, Manning, Marvin, Mayo, Merriman, Miller, Morris, Morton, Mosse, Moulton, Munger, Needham, Parker, Parkhurst, Potter, Peck, Pettiplace, Purefoy, Priest, Rusco, St John, Scofield, Seymour, Sherman, Smith, Strong, Swinnerton, Symonds, Threlkell, Thorne, Ventriss, Wade, Watson, Weed, White, and Yorke.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Seymour, Violet Isabel Johnson – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Violet Isabel Johnson Seymour died May 29, 2007 in Enterprise. She was 76. Mrs. Seymour was born Sept. 5, 1930, to Elmer and Evelyn Johnson in Saskatchewan, Canada. She married Gail Seymour on Jan 1. 1950. She was a professional bowler with a league for seven years. She worked for Boeing Company in the 1970’s, in real estate and with the Boeing Employees Credit Union. She retired from the BECU in 1983. She was a member of the Alpine Golf Course, was active in the Women’s Golf Club Leadership and a member of Civil Air Patrol, attaining the

Emma Louisa Todd Seymour of Rochester NY

SEYMOUR, Emma Louisa Todd9, (Luzerne8, Lemuel7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 27, 1851, married Dec. 20, 1871, Elbert B. Seymour. They lived in Rochester, N. Y. Children: I. Belle, b. Dec. 22, 1872, d. June 10, 1906. II. Kate, b. Oct. 6, 1874. III. Luella Todd, b. Oct. 15, 1881, m. Oct. 6, 1909,(???) Dieterichs.

Biography of Edwin Chidsey Seymour

Edwin Chidsey Seymour, Sheriff of San Bernardino County, was born in Otsego County, New York, in 1845. His father, also a native of the Empire State, was a cabinet-maker by trade, and moved to northern Pennsylvania when Edwin was a lad of seven years. Here he grew up to manhood and learned the trade of cabinet-maker with his father. Upon the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion he responded to his country’s call, entering the army as a member of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Infantry, and remained four years and nearly three months, chiefly in the Army of the