Surname: Knox

Masthead of the Lily in Seneca Falls

A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as The

Natchez Under the Hill

Natchez Trace

In 1792, in a council held at Chickasaw Bluffs, where Memphis, Tennessee, is now located, a treaty was made with the Chickasaws, in which they granted the United States the right of way through their territory for a public road to be opened from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. This road was long known, and no doubt, remembered by many at the present time by the name “Natchez Trace.” It crossed the Tennessee River at a point then known as “Colberts Ferry,” and passed through the present counties of Tishomingo, Ittiwamba, Lee, Pantotoc, Chickasaw, Choctaw, thence on to Natchez, and

Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he

Stanford Chapman

Biography of Stanford Chapman

Missouri Few men have lived more quietly and unostentatiously than Mr. Stanford Chapman, and yet few have exerted a more salutary influence upon the immediate society in which they move, or impressed a community with a more profound reliance on their honor, ability and sterling worth. His life has not been marked by startling or striking contrasts, but it has shown how a laudable ambition may be gratified when accompanied by pure motives, perseverance, industry and steadfastness of purpose. Mr. Chapman came originally from Tennessee, his birth occurring June 3, 1825. He is the son of Benjamin and Mary (Cavett)

Slave Narrative of Matilda Brooks

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Matilda Brooks Location: Monticello, Florida Age: 79 A Governor’s Slave Matilda Brooks, 79, who lives in Monticello, Fla., was once a slave of a South Carolina governor. Mrs. Brooks was born in 1857 or 1858 in Edgefield, S.C. Her parents were Hawkins and Harriet Knox, and at the time of the birth of their daughter were slaves on a large plantation belonging to Governor Frank Pickens. On this plantation were raised cotton, corn, potatoes, tobacco, peas, wheat and truck products. As soon as Matilda was large enough to go into the fields she helped her

Biography of Manasseh Stewart Knox

Manasseh Stewart Knox is one of the oldesb residents of Pottawatomie County. His own recollections of that district cover a period of sixty years, beginning in his early childhood. He knew Pottawatomie County when it was a virtual wilderness and when Kansas was still in the throes of the free stats struggle. Mr. Knox is one of the most substantial land holders and formerly one of the largest farmers in Northern Kansas and is president of the First National Bank of Havensville and had banking interests elsewhere. He was born in Cayuga County, New York, August 21, 1843. His ancestors

Biographical Sketch of William Knox

Knox, William; architect; born, Glasgow, Scotland, Jan. 20, 1858; son of Thomas and Margaret Neilson Knox; studied in the Free Church Seminary, in Glasgow, special course in architecture in Glasgow and Edinburgh; married, Painesville, O., June 21, 1891, Miss Agnes Julia Child; issue, three children, Carlos C., Beulah G., and M. Neilson; business career, successor to Mr. Aitken, in the firm of Moffett & Aitken, in Edinburgh; in 1886, left Scotland to travel; applied for and secured position with Burnham & Root, architects, of Chicago, Ill.; later office mgr. for Henry Ives Cobb, eminent architect; came to Cleveland in 1893;