Surname: Grant

1921 Farm Map of Audubon Township, Audubon County, Iowa

1921 Farmers Directory of Audubon Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; (), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allexander, David. Wf. Clara; ch. Alice, Frank and Mable. Anita, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 33. Isabell Duthie. Alt, Wm. Ch. Ruth, Raymond and Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 50 ac., sec. 7; O. 275 ac., sec. 8 (8.) Anderson Bros. P. O. Adair, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 12;O. 40 ac., sec. 1. (45.) Owners, G. A. Anderson and Andrew Anderson. Anderson., Chris. Wf. Alvilda; ch.Nels and Elsie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 161.51 ac., sec. 31.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Cover of History of Cayuga County New York

History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties New York

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed,

The Emerson Brothers of Norwich Vermont

About the year 1792, Elihu Emerson, just then arrived at his majority, came to Norwich Vermont from Westfield, Massachusetts; followed in 1795 by Joseph and later by Thomas, two younger brothers. These young men became heads of families, and were prominent residents in town for many years. Elihu was a blacksmith by trade, and carried on business in a shop that he built a short distance north of his residence on “Norwich Plain” For his first wife Mr. Emerson married Thankful Grant, and for his second wife Cynthia Brooks. The first wife died in 1834, aged fifty-eight years, and the

Fils de Quebec cover

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North

Columbus Landing on Hispaniola

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so

An Artists rendition of James Smith

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Journey of Bartram Through Alabama

William Bartram, the botanist, passed through the Creek nation, and went from thence to Mobile. He found that that town extended back from the river nearly half a mile. Some of the houses were vacant, and others were in ruins. Yet a few good buildings were inhabited by the French gentlemen, and others by refined emigrants of Ireland, Scotland, England, and the Northern British Colonies. The Indian trade was under management of Messrs. Swanson and McGillivray. They conducted an extensive commerce with the Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Creeks. Their buildings were commodious, and well arranged for that purpose. The principal houses

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

The Proprietors of Norwich Vermont

The larger part of the names of the grantees of Norwich are names of Connecticut men then resident in Mansfield and neighboring towns. Captain Hezekiah Johnson, Samuel Slafter, Joseph Storrs, and William Johnson 3rd, are known to have lived in Mansfield; Amos Fellows, James West, Adoniram Grant, and Samuel Cobb were of Tolland; Ebenezar Heath, Captain Abner Barker and William Johnson of Willington, towns adjacent to Mansfield on the north. The last nine names are those of New Hampshire and Massachusetts men, several of them members of the provincial government in the former province. Major Joseph Blanchard was of Dunstable,

The Original Grantees of Norwich Vermont

The following is a list of men who received grants of land in the future town of Norwich Vermont on 5 July 1761. Most of these men resided in and around Mansfield Connecticut. Many of the men never set foot in the actual town of Norwich, choosing at some point not to accept Eleaer Wales Daniel Welch Abner Barker Ebenezer Wales Ebenezer Heath William Johnson ye 3d Gideon Noble James West Daniel Baldwin Calvin Topliff Samuel Johnson Elisha Wales Seth Wales Amos Fellows Jedidiah Brinton John Fowler Nathan Strong Robert Turner William Johnson Samuel Root Solomon Wales Joseph Blanchard Josiah

Theodore F. Jimerson (De-hah-teh), Cattaraugus Seneca

Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and improved

Slave Narrative of Annie Groves Scott

Person Interviewed: Annie Groves Scott Place of Birth: Lyonsville, South Carolina Date of Birth: March 18, 1845 Just before the war broke out I was fifteen year old and my mistress told me I was born March 18, 1845, at a little place she called Lyonsville, South Carolina. Maw (that’s all the name she ever called her mother) was born at Charlotte, N.C., and father was born at Lyonsville, same as me, and his name was Levi Grant, which changed to Groves when he was sold by Master Grant. That was when I was a baby and I wants to

Genealogy of the Cherokee Grant Family

Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 Ludovic Grant. Al 1112 Grant. William Emory. 111213 Mary Emory. Rim Fawling and Ezekial Buffington. A2 2 Elizabeth Emory Robert Due and John Rogers. OK 3 Susannah Emory John Stuart, Richard Fields and Joseph Martin. 11121314 John Fawling. Nannie Vann. A4 2 William Emory _________ OK 3 Samuel Martin. Catherine Hildebrand, Charlotte Wickett _________ 4 Elizabeth Buffington. David McLaughlin and Jeremiah C. Towers 5 Susannah Buffington. Jeffrey Beck and Surry Eaton 6 Annie Buffington. * James Daniel 7 Ellis Buffington Catherine Daniel and Lydia Snow nee Wright 8 Mary Buffington. James Daniel

Slave Narrative of Barney Stone

Interviewer: Robert C. Irvin Person Interviewed: Barney Stone Location: Noblesville, Indiana Place of Birth: Spencer County, Kentucky Date of Birth: May 17, 1847 Age: 91 (about) Robert C. Irvin District #2 Noblesville, Ind. EX-SLAVE, LIFE STORY OF BARNEY STONE, FORMER SLAVE, HAMILTON CO. This is the life story of Barney Stone, a highly respected colored gentleman of Noblesville, Hamilton County seat. Mr. Stone is near nintey-one years old, is in sound physical condition and still has a remarkable memory. He was a slave in the state of Kentucky for more than sixteen years and a soldier in the Union army

Biographical Sketch of Edward Grant

Grant, Edward, Middlebury, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, on March 14, 1810. His parents were Dennis and Martha Dallis. The family on both sides were of Scotch origin. Edward Grant came to America in the spring of 1847, when he came direct to Middlebury village, and remained there six years. He was a weaver by trade, and was employed in the cottonmill there. He was a resident of Burlington for two and one-half years, where he was employed as watchman for the R. & B. R. R. He then went to Leicester, where he engaged in the lime business

Biographical Sketch of G. O. Grant

Grant, G. 0. (See Grant, Halfbreed and Duncan)—George Owen, son of Edward and Susannah (Paden) Grant born December 25, 1883, graduated from Male Seminary May 28, 1902. Married Dec. 30, 1906, Lillie May, daughter of Jeter Lynch and Kezia (Moore) Cunningham, born May 23, 1879. They are the parents of: Owen C. Grant, born September 25, 1910; Kezia Elizabeth Grant, born September 28, 1914; Victor Monnet Grant, born Feb. 26, 1917. George Owen Grant was elected Register of Deeds of Adair County in 1910. Gradu­ated from the Law Department of the Uni­versity of Oklahoma in June 1914. Elected County Attorney