Surname: Gentry

Early Life in Colorado

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

1860 Free Inhabitants Creek Nation Page 1

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

History of Western Nebraska and its People

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the

Treaty of May 6, 1828, page 9

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

Biographical Sketch of David Gentry

David Gentry, of Virginia, married Jane Kendrick, and settled in Madison County, Ky. They had Bright B., Pleasant, David, Dickey, Martin, Bailey, and five daughters. Bright B. married Martha Jones, and they had James, Margaret, David, Jonathan J., Eliza, Susan, Albert, and Fanny. David settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Polly A. Groom. Jonathan also settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Elizabeth McFarland.

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William M. Gentry

Gentry, Mrs. William M. (See Hicks)— Margaret, daughter of Robert Ray and Cynthia Jane (Horn) Taylor, was born Nov. 10, 1873, educated at Worcester Academy, and Willie Halsell College, Vinita. Married at Weston, Texas, April 18, 1891, William M. Son of W. J. and Nancy A. Gentry, born August 10, 1871, in Ray County, Missouri. They are the parents of: Ralph Ray, born July 7, 1893; Blanche Sunbeam, born Oct. 15, 1896; Christopher Robert, born March 23, 1900; Winnie Gertrude, born April 7, 1902; Hearst T., born May 6, 1904; William Lee, born April 30, 1908; Annie Audrey, born January

Biography of Allen Gentry

ALLEN GENTRY. This gentleman is one of the oldest and best known pioneers of Stone County, which has been his home since 1836, a period of over fifty-eight years. The founder of the family in this section was Allen Gentry, Sr., father of subject, a native of Tennessee, where the family was an old and prominent one, and a descendant of Revolutionary stock. He was married in his native State to Miss Margaret , and in the spring of 1836 he and wife crossed the Mississippi River and located on James River, near Galena, in Stone County, where the father

Slave Narrative of James Baker

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: James Baker Location: With daughter who own home at 941 Wade St., Hot Springs, Arkansas Age: 81 The outskirts of eastern Hot Springs resemble a vast checkerboard—patterned in Black and White. Within two blocks of a house made of log-faced siding—painted a spotless white and provided with blue shutters will be a shack which appears to have been made from the discard of a dozen generations of houses. Some of the yards are thick with rusting cans, old tires and miscelaneous rubbish. Some of them are so gutted by gully wash that any attempt

Clyde H. Gentry

Private., Batry. E, 81st Div., 317th F. Artly.; son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Gentry; of Rockingham County. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Madison, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 8, 1919.