Surname: Fields

Treaty of May 6, 1828, page 9

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

Title page to the Bacon Family Genealogy

Ralph Bacon Genealogy

The Bacon Family Genealogy descends the Bacon family tree through the children of Ralph Bacon, 2nd. Ralph was born in New York State abt the year 1777. At the age of 17, about the year 1794, he traveled to Painesville Ohio. Eventually acquiring some land there, he would marry Mary Jourden in 1801. In 1820 he moved his family to Crawford County, Ohio, owning houses and land in the townships of Liberty and Whetstone. His wife died 5 Oct 1845, he died 15 Jun 1849. This union would produce 13 offspring, twelve of whom would marry and raise families of their own. This Bacon Family Genealogy is their story.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

Biographical Sketch of Ezekial Fields

(See Grant and Ward) Ezekial, son of Richard and Elizabeth Jane (Blagg) Fields was born in Delaware District November 16, 1859, educated in the Cherokee National schools. Married Sabra Elizabeth, daughter of George Howard and Mary Carroll Ward. Their children are: Clarissa Eliza, born Mar 28, 1870; Richard, born Nov. 17, 1873; Belle, born in 1875; Luvonia born in 1877; and Cora Fields born in 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Ezekial Fields separated and he married December 6, 1399 Lennie Marshall born July 30, 1877 in McDonald County, Missouri. They are the parents of: Inez L., born September 18, 1900; Edna

Biographical Sketch of William Lee Fields

(See Grant)-William Lee, Fields, born in Cooweescoowee District, November 29, 1875, educated at Willie Halsell College and Male Seminary. Married in June 1902 Dora E. Johnson. They were the parents of Bertha Helena, born August 29, 1903, married Jesse McCreary June 8, 1921; Violet Fern, born October 17, 1908; Apple Dorothy Fields, born June 20, 1910; William Lee, born March 20, 1913; Jesse Thomas, born April 17, 1915; Franklin Chester born August 15, 1917 and Fredonia Ellen Fields, born December 22, 1920. Henry Clay, son of Richard and Mary (Wilds) Fields born October 21, 1844 married in February 1861 Amanda

Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his

Slave Narrative of John Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Residence: 2120 N. 20th Street, Lafayette, Indiana Cecil Miller Dist. #3 Tipp. Co. [TR: Tippecanoe Co.] NEGRO FOLKLORE MR. JOHN FIELDS, EX-SLAVE 2120 N. 20th St. Lafayette, Indiana Mr. Fields says that all negro slaves were ardent believers in ghosts, supernatual powers, tokens and “signs.” The following story illustrates the point. “A turkey gobbler had mysteriously disappeared from one of the neighboring plantations and the local slaves were accused of commeting the fowl to a boiling pot. A slave convicted of theft was punished severly. As all