Surname: Bush

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected

Church History of Norwich Vermont

The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten

Norwich Vermont and Dartmouth College

Notwithstanding the fact that Norwich had for many years within its borders a collegiate institution of its own, founded and directed by its most distinguished son, the relations of their people towards Dartmouth College on the opposite bank of the Connecticut were always intimate and friendly.

List of the Principal Pioneer Settlers in Norwich Vermont

The counties of Cumberland and Gloucester had been organized by New York in 1766, out of the territory lying between the Green Mountains and Connecticut River. In the year 1771 a census of these counties was made under the authority of that province. All the towns in Windham and Windsor Counties, as now constituted, belonged to Cumberland County; the remaining portion of the state to the north-ward, then mostly unsettled, was called the county of Gloucester. 1In the first organization of eastern Vermont into counties by New York, Norwich belonged to Cumberland County. In March, 1772, a change of boundary

Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that

Biographical Sketch of William Bush

William Bush, of Fayette Co., Ky., had Benjamin, Ambrose, Levi, and Matilda. Benjamin married and settled in Illinois, on the bank of the Mississippi river, and was murdered under the following circumstances Parties on the opposite side of the river owed him a considerable amount of money, and he went over on the ferryboat, one day, to collect it. As he was returning that evening he was robbed while on the boat, and then thrown into the river. Levi and Matilda Bush both married and lived and died in Kentucky. Ambrose married Nancy Douglass, and settled first in Illinois, near

Hodgen Cemetery, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

To get to Hodgen Cemetery take Hwy #59 south from the main intersection in Hodgen about 1/2 mi, then right. This is the cemetery for the town of Hodgen, and still active. Our thanks to Paula Doyle-Bicket for the submission of these cemeteries to our online collection. [box]Source: Copyright © 2004, by Paula Doyle-Bicket. All Rights Reserved[/box]

Biography of James E. Bush

Success in this age of marked business activity and competition depends upon wide knowledge of the line to which one directs his energy, combined with unfaltering diligence. There is no one more competent to speak with authority upon the question of varnish in the entire United States than James E. Bush., who has long occupied a position as traveling salesman in that connection and is now vice president of the Chicago Varnish Company. He is among the native sons of Racine County whose business records reflect credit upon the district which gave them birth. Mr. Bush was born at Ives

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Bush

W.H. Bush, if the firm of Lowell & Bush, harness makers and dealers in all kinds of horse furnishings, was born in 1849, in Morris County, N.J.; moved to Des Moines, Ia., in 1869; there learned the mason’s trade with Morris & Naphey, and moved to Denison, Ia., in 1873; worked at the trade until 1881, when he formed his present partnership. They keep two men employed, and in the spring of 1882 will move business to larger building.

Biography of James H. Bush

James H. Bush, deceased, was one of the prominent and widely known businessmen of Boise, where he spent the greater part of his life. He was born in White Lake, Oakland County, Michigan, July 29, 1842, and was a son of Elias Oliver and Mary Jane (Fife) Bush, both of whom were well-to-do farmers and early settlers of Michigan and members of the Baptist church. James Bush was educated in Flint, Michigan, and in early manhood was a purser on a steamboat. In February, 1865, he sailed from New York for the Pacific coast by way of Panama, reaching Boise