Surname: Boling

1860 Free Inhabitants Creek Nation Page 1

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biography of Mrs. Julia M. Boling

(See Grant)-Julia Matilda daughter of John and Ruth (Hall) was born Tuesday June 22, 1869 in Georgia. Married at the Martin Davis homestead on the Chickamauga battle ground, Georgia, December 3, 1891 James Madison, son of Reuben and Marguerite Boling born 31, 1856. He graduated from University of Georgia, Graduate of Missouri Medical College, Louis and University of Pennsylvania, Boling, who was a thirty second degree in died June 6, 1916. A pioneer physician and friend to the Cherokee and did much good. Reserved, talented and gracious; Mrs. Boling being possessed of ample means maintains a home in Tulsa, but

Boling, Lillian Carroll Page Mrs. – Obituary

Wallowa, Wallowa County, Oregon Lillian Carroll Page was born November 23, 1862, in Iowa City, Iowa, and died December 13, 1936, in Wallowa. She was a daughter of Sarah and Martin Page. She was married to George Boling on March 9, 1884, at Nevada, Missouri. The came to Wallowa, Oregon to make their home October 17, 1902, and her husband preceded her in death on June 19, 1919. She was a devoted member of the Christian church for many years and a faithful attendant. Grandma Boling, as every one called her, was loved by every one, as she was kindness

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government