Bell

Horton Genealogy of Rehoboth and Attleboro Massachusetts

This branch of the Horton family has furnished to Attleboro, Mass., three generations of business men. Gideon Martin Horton, who was a well known merchant there a half century ago, and his four sons, Everett Southworth, Edwin Jackson, Gideon Martin and James Jackson Horton, all became successful jewelry manufacturers and prominent citizens. The eldest and last surviving brother, the late Maj. Everett S. Horton and his nephew, Raymond Martin Horton, were the only male representatives of the name residing there at the time of the Major’s death.

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Bell of Beltour

HENRY BELL of ASCHAM m. (2nd) Agnes Brogan (b. Cardiff , Wales ). Andrew Bell, his son, had two sons and a daughter, Hugone. One son, Hugh Bell, was knighted by Edward I in 1306 and appears in list of Knights as “Hugo filius Henrici” with his brother “Aungerus filius Henricri”. Hugo was awarded the

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Narrative of the Sufferings of Peter Williamson – Indian Captivities

Not for the faint of heart or stomach, this is a graphically descriptive recounting of the captivity of Peter Williamson, who was taken by the Delaware Indians, at his own house near the forks of the Delaware in Pennsylvania. Of all the sufferings reported by captives, this particular account appears to go above and beyond the usual descriptions, almost to the point of unbelievability – because in this case, he doesn’t simply report the acts of cruelty, but vividly describes them in the most horrid fashion, even to claim the Delaware committed cannibalism on one of their captives, and then explaining how they did it.

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The Descendants of Franklin Mary Noyes Rowe of Humboldt County, Iowa

Franklin Rowe, son of Lucy Stillwell and Lucian Rowe, was born in Onondaga County, New York, possibly at Manlius as his parents were married there March 16, 1826. Franklin was the youngest and eighth child, born December 30, 1836. He was the grandson of Ebenezer and Mary Rowe, his grandfather was born in 1772 and died February 16, 1828 and is buried in Christ Church cemetery at Manlius, New York, his name is in the 1820 census but not in that of 1810 so he must have come to Onondaga County between those dates but diligent search has not been rewarded with further information regarding the lineage of Franklin Rowe. He had the following brothers and sisters, whose names may not be given in order of birth: Elihu, Thaddeus, Charlotte, Caroline, Mary, Martha, and Lucy.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Andrew J. Bell

Private, Field Artillery, Batry. A, 30th Div., 113th Reg.; of Carteret County; son of U. S. G. and E. Bell. Entered service Aug. 6, 1917, at Morehead City, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France June 5, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne, Woevre offensive. Landed in USA March 19, 1919.

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William S. Bell

Private, 1st class, Co. H, 30th Div., 120th Reg.; of Bertie County; son of Mr. N. B. and Mrs. Sarah Bell. Husband of Mrs. Cassie (Bryant) Bell. Entered service at Roxobel, N.C., June 25, 1917. Sent to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France May 27, 1918. Promoted to 1st class Private Aug. 25, 1917. Fought in

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Elder James Martin of the District of Orangeburg South Carolina

Steve Malone’s work, “Elder James Martin of the Districts of Orangeburg, Lower Ninety-Six, Edgefield and Barnwell, South Carolina; Warren County, Kentucky; and Knox, Gibson, Posey and Vanderburgh Counties, Indiana Territory/Indiana, and his brother, Simon Martin of the Same Districts in South Carolina,” offers a meticulous exploration into the life of an individual whose existence paints a vivid picture of the American frontier during its formative years. Free to read or download.

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B Surnames – Walpole Massachusetts Marriage Records to 1850

BABBITT, Betsey and Samuel G. Clap, Mar. 8, 1843. Sarah P., 21, d. Willard and S., and Luther Hayward, widower [publishment of intention of marriage, omits widower], May 29, 1848. Sophia and George Copeland, Apr. 10, 1842. BACON, Alfred of Dover, and Harriett Perry, Nov. 27, 1834. Anna of Dedham, and William Kindall 1st, publishment

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Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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Bell of Thirsk

A101 RALPH BELL. A102 Robert, of Sowerby: 1615-1711. A103 Ralph, of Sowerby: d. s. p. 1735. He was succeeded by his nephew. A104 Ralph Consett, of Brawith Hall, who assumed under his uncle’s will, the surname of Bell : d. 1770. A105 Ralph, of Thirsk: b. 1720. (1) John, A106. (2) Robert, of Kildale: b.

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Bell Family Genealogy

J. Montgomery Seaver began to publish manuscripts in the 1920’s on what he called the 100 most prominent names in America. In actuality, they were simply 100 of the most common names, and the whole series was part of a scam in which Jesse was eventually charged by Postal Inspectors. While Jesse over emphasized the benefits of his manuscripts, he did in fact provide some relevant information. The following manuscript is part of the Bell Family History published by Jesse in 1924. In it you will find short genealogies on many British and early American Bell families.

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Alleged 1818 Chickasaw Roll – Surname Index

This is an English surname transcription of the alleged 1818 Chickasaw roll said to have been lost in the beginning of the 19th century. I expect, if this is a true roll, that it is the result of the Treaty of October 19, 1818 between the Chickasaw Nation and the United States. I have some doubts, however, as the treaty stipulates payments and land to the tribe, not to individual tribal members as later treaties would. It would be at the discretion of the tribe on how to settle the reservation and distribute the payments.

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