Bean

Families of Ancient New Haven

The Families of Ancient New Haven compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

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Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

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The Cox family in America

Two volumes of Cox family genealogy combined as one. The first volume contains information about the various early Cox families across America. The second volume deals specifically with the descendants of James and Sarah Cock of Killingworth upon Matinecock, in the township of Oysterbay, Long Island, New York.

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Sevier County 1830 Tennessee Census

Published in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1956 and distributed by the Genealogical Publishing Company of Baltimore, Maryland, Sevier County, Tennessee: Population Schedule of the United States Census of 1830 (Fifth Census) provides a transcription of the often difficult to read, 1830 Sevier County Tennessee census. Authored by Blanche C. McMahon and Pollyanna Creekmore, this meticulous reproduction of the original census record sheds light on the people of Sevier County in 1830.

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Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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Biography of Fred Bean

Fred Bean remained at home until his marriage, there obtaining a practical experience in general agricultural work. On October 15, 1877, he married Miss Frances A., daughter of Francis and Abigail (Gage) Robbins. Immediately after he moved on to the Robbins homestead, which he has since conducted. Mr. Robbins was born July 9, 1815, in

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Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.

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Biography of James H. Bean, M. D.

James H. Bean, M. D., has attained a distinctive position in connection with the medical fraternity of southern Idaho, and is now successfully engaged in practicing in Pocatello, where he also conducts a drug store. Realizing the importance of the profession, he has carefully prepared himself for his chosen life work, and spares no effort

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