Surname: Austin

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Sue Austin

(See Cordery)-Sue, daughter of Charles Harris and Pearl Victoria (Haas) Sisson, born December 14, 1898, at Ft. Gibson; educated at Ft. Gibson, Muskogee and Claremore. Married at Claremore June 5, 1920 Ervin F. son of Henry and Sallie Austin. Mr. Austin is engaged in wholesale dry goods business at Clarmore. Thomas Cordery, an Irishman married Susannah, a full blood Cherokee of the Blind Savannah Clan. Their daughter Nannie married Parker Collins and they were the parents of Jennie Collins who married Charles Harris of Spartanberg district, S. Carolina Charles and Jennie Harris were the parents Narcissa, born in 1841, married

Hodgen Cemetery, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

To get to Hodgen Cemetery take Hwy #59 south from the main intersection in Hodgen about 1/2 mi, then right. This is the cemetery for the town of Hodgen, and still active. Our thanks to Paula Doyle-Bicket for the submission of these cemeteries to our online collection. [box]Source: Copyright © 2004, by Paula Doyle-Bicket. All Rights Reserved[/box]

Slave Narrative of Charity Austin

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Charity Austin Location: 507 South Bloodworth Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: July 27, 1852 Place of Birth: Granville County NC I wus borned in the year 1852, July 27. I wus born in Granville County, sold to a slave speculator at ten years old and carried to Southwest, Georgia. I belonged to Samuel Howard. His daughter took me to Kinston, North Carolina and I stayed there until I wus sold. She married a man named Bill Brown, and her name wus Julia Howard Brown. My father wus named Paul Howard and my

Biographical Sketch of James A. Austin

James Augustus Austin, clerk of the county court, etc., is a son of James Austin, one of the yeomanry of the county of Peel, and was born in the township of Toronto, in this county, February 5, 1835. The maiden name of his mother was Eleanor Aikins. Both parents are dead. James was reared on the farm, attending a common school in his younger years, and subsequently spending three years at Victoria College, Cobourg, intending at one time to study for the medical profession, but not completing his College course on account of failing health. He continued farming in the

Slave Narrative of Hannah Austin

Interviewer: Minnie B. Ross Person Interviewed: Hannah Austin Location: Georgia Age: 70-75 When the writer was presented to Mrs. Hannah Austin she was immediately impressed with her alert youthful appearance. Mrs. Austin is well preserved for her age and speaks clearly and with much intelligence. The interview was a brief but interesting one. This was due partly to the fact that Mrs. Austin was a small child when The Civil War ended and too because her family was classed as “town slaves” so classed because of their superior intelligence. Mrs. Austin was a child of ten or twelve years when

Slave Narrative of Bill Austin

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Bill Austin Location: Greenwood, Florida Bill Austin – he says his name is NOT Williams – is an ex-slave who gained his freedom because his mistress found it more advantageous to free him than to watch him. Austin lives near Greenwood, Jackson County, Florida, on a small farm that he and his children operate. He says that he does not know his age, does not remember ever having heard it. But he must be pretty old, he says, “cause I was a right smart size when Mistuh Smith went off to fight.” He thinks he

Slave Narrative of Margrett Nickerson

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Margrett Nickerson Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 89-90 In her own vernacular, Margrett Nickerson was “born to William A. Carr, on his plantation near Jackson, Leon County, many years ago.” When questioned concerning her life on this plantation, she continues: “Now honey, it’s been so long ago, I don’ ‘meber ev’ything, but I will tell you whut I kin as near right as possible; I kin ‘member five uf Marse Carr’s chillun; Florida, Susan, ‘Lijah, Willie and Tom; cose Carr never ‘lowed us to have a piece of paper in our hands.” “Mr. Kilgo was

J. C. Austin

Cook, 15th Co., Infantry. Son of J. H. and M. M. Austin. Husband of L. A. Austin, of Rowan County. Entered service June 6, 1918, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Was mustered out of service at Camp Sevier, S. C., November 30th, 1918.

Austin, Kittie Mabel – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Kittie Austin Laid To Rest Memorial services were held Monday afternoon from the Booth-Bollman Chapel for Kittie Mabel Austin, who passed away at the Wallowa Memorial Hospital February 1, 1957, following a two-day illness. Rev. Leslie B. Bailey officiated with Rev. James Sinclair, soloist, and Mrs. John Sinclair at the piano. Songs were “The Old Rugged Cross” and “Beautiful Isle of Somewhere”. Burial was in the Enterprise cemetery beside her husband who passed away in January of 1949. Pallbearers were: Armel Cole, Guy Murrill, Spencer Bacon, Jack Sturm, Clyde Wulff and Doke Cole. Kittie Mabel Austin

Oscar B. Austin

1st Class Private, Co. D, 30th Div., 113th Field Artillery. Son of H. F. and Lola Austin, of Catawba County. Entered service July 25, 1917, at Wadesboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier. Overseas to France June 17, 1918. Fought at Argonne Forest and St. Mihiel. Returned April 13, 1919. Landed at Charleston, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, April 18, 1919.