Stafford County VA

Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the …

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The Register of Saint Paul’s Parish, 1715-1798

The “Register of Saint Paul’s Parish, 1715-1798: Stafford County, Virginia, 1715-1776; King George County, Virginia, 1777-1798” stands as an invaluable resource for genealogists and historians alike, documenting the early inhabitants of Virginia across two jurisdictions over eight decades. This publication, meticulously compiled and now presented in a handsomely bound volume thanks to the restoration efforts sponsored by the John Lee and Lillian Thomas Pratt Foundation in 1940. This book is free to read and download.

Potomac Tribe

A small group of families, whose names are mostly Newton and Green (figs. 40, 41), represent what may be the Indians who are recorded to Potomac creek, an affluent of about eight miles north of Fredericksburg in Stafford County, Virginia. We have not, however, clear proof that these descendants are actually of Potomac identity, although …

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Manahoac Tribe

Manahoac Indians (Algonquian: ‘they are very merry.’ – Tooker). A confederacy or group of small tribes or bands possibly Siouan, in north Virginia, in 1608, occupying the country from the falls of the rivers to the mountains and from the Potomac to North Anna river. They were at war with the Powhatan and Iroquois, and …

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