Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Biographical Sketch of William Kornman

Kornman, William; prop. cafe; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., Aug. 21, 1866; son of Peter and Marguerite Frank Kornman; educated, public schools, Pittsburgh, Pa.; married, Cleveland, 1907, Jennie Pendergrast; one son, William H. Kornman, Jr.; member National Order of Eagles and Knights of Pythias.

Biographical Sketch of Isaac Morris

Morris, Isaac; manager; born, Cradley, England, Aug. 4, 1853; son of John Morris; educated, English common schools; married, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Mary Allen Southall; issue, two sons and two daughters; citizen-Republican; one of the common people; business career, messenger, 1863; telegraph operator, 1870; steelworker, 1872 to 1878; Western Union Telegraph Co., as operator, chief operator and …

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Biography of John Minto

JOHN MINTO. – While Oregon was held to freedom and the American union against the magnified sprit of despotism of England, as exemplified in the Hudson’s Bay Company’s rule, in the valley of the Columbia, it is worthy of note that an Englishman made as good an American, and, in the capacity of settler, would …

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, …

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Biographical Sketch of Norris J. Clarke

Clarke, Norris J.; born, Cleveland, Aug. 29, 1880; son of Jay M. and Lena D. Clarke; educated, Cleveland public schools and Central High School; married, Sewickley, Pa., June 24, 1907, Katherine Pearson; two daughters, Kathleen and Marguerite; entered the employ of The Bourne-Fuller Co. in 1897, as office boy and worked at all office positions, …

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Biographical Sketch of James Welch Frazier

Frazier, James Welch; consulting engineer; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., July 4, 1870; son of George G. and Sadie B. Smith Frazier; educated, Grammar and High School, Allegheny, Pa.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; graduated, 1894, degree of Civil Engineer; married, Troy, N. Y., 1895, Jennie H. Van Deusen; two daughters, Ruth and Helen; chief engineer Federal St. & …

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Biography of Frederic H. Rhodes

FREDERIC H. RHODES – From junior clerk to president of a large insurance concern, and owing his promotion to nothing else but inherent capacity and gifts of an exceptionally high kind coupled with energy, perseverance and tenacity in following a certain guiding line, such is in brief the career of Frederic H. Rhodes, president of …

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of William McKinley Duncan

Duncan, William McKinley; lawyer; born, Pittsburg, Pa., May 19, 1873; son of Andrew J. and Sarah McKinley Duncan; educated, public schools Pittsburgh, Pa., and Rayen High School, Youngstown, O., and Cornell University, Ithaca., N. Y.; married, Youngstown, O., Oct. 18, 1899, Viola Deetrick; issue, three sons; admitted to bar, October, 1894; associated with Squire, Sanders …

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Biographical Sketch of William L. Rohbock

Rohbock, William L.; chief engineer, W. & L. E. R. R. Co.; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., June 7, 1873; son of Henry and Mary Rohbock; educated, Pittsburgh public and high schools; married, Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 15, 1901, Mary Newton Nuttall; three children; finished school in 1888; eight years various manufacturing concerns, including printing and lithographing companies …

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Biographical Sketch of Harry Prescott Simpson

Simpson, Harry Prescott; advertising counselor and advisor; born, Chelton, Eng., Jan. 24, 1870; son of William Grace and Jane Benson Luce Simpson; educated at St. Margaret’s Grammar School, Kent, Eng.; married, Pittsburgh, April 6, 1896, Laura Mudge; issue, one son, Edmund Gordon; in stove manufacturing, Pittsburgh, fifteen years; advertising counselor, eight years; pres. Fowler-Simpson Co.; …

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An Account of the Sufferings of Mercy Harbison – Indian Captivities

On the 4th of November, 1791, a force of Americans under General Arthur St. Clair was attacked, near the present Ohio-Indiana boundary line, by about the same number of Indians led by Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, and the white renegade Simon Girty. Their defeat was the most disastrous that ever has been suffered by our arms when engaged against a savage foe on anything like even terms. Out of 86 officers and about 1400 regular and militia soldiers, St. Clair lost 70 officers killed or wounded, and 845 men killed, wounded, or missing. The survivors fled in panic, throwing away their weapons and accoutrements. Such was “St. Clair’s defeat.”

The utter incompetency of the officers commanding this expedition may be judged from the single fact that a great number of women were allowed to accompany the troops into a wilderness known to be infested with the worst kind of savages. There were about 250 of these women with the “army” on the day of the battle. Of these, 56 were killed on the spot, many being pinned to the earth by stakes driven through their bodies. Few of the others escaped captivity.

After this unprecedented victory, the Indians became more troublesome than ever along the frontier. No settler’s home was safe, and many were destroyed in the year of terror that followed. The awful fate of one of those households is told in the following touching narrative of Mercy Harbison, wife of one of the survivors of St. Clair’s defeat. How two of her little children were slaughtered before her eyes, how she was dragged through the wilderness with a babe at her breast, how cruelly maltreated, and how she finally escaped, barefooted and carrying her infant through days and nights of almost superhuman exertion, she has left record in a deposition before the magistrates at Pittsburgh and in the statement here reprinted.

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