Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Biographical Sketch of Willis Stutson

Stutson, Willis; sales mgr. The Oldsmobile Co.; born, Lancaster, O., Jan. 28, 1884; son of Alverd and Emma Stutson; educated, Asheville schools, Asheville, N. C.; married, Pittsburgh, Pa., April 23, 1905, Ethel Crozier; issue, one daughter, Elizabeth Stutson; 1904-1905, special agt. New York Life Insurance Co., traveling out of Dayton, O.; 1905, 1906, 1907, has […]

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Murray

Murray, Charles B.; chemist and metallurgist; born, Worcester, Massachusetts, April 6, 1866; son of Peleg F. and Mary Prince Murray; educated, common schools at Worcester; took B. S. degree at Polytechnic Institute, at Worcester, Mass., in 1887; married, Attleboro, Mass., Jan. 29, 1890; Ellen Lincoln Robinson; issue, two children, Philip F., and Mildred A.; after

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Biographical Sketch of William Fleming Abel

Abel, William Fleming; manager; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., April 2, 1875; son of Joseph and Louise Marchand Abel; educated, Washington-Jefferson college; married, Pittsburg, Pa., March 18, 1899, Mary D. Coyle; member Iron and Steel Institute of England, International Society for Testing Materials, Automobile Engineers; member F. & A. M., Tyrian Lodge, Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, Rotary

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Biographical Sketch of James K. Dillon

Dillon, James K.; assistant general passenger agt. Pennsylvania R. R.; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 25, 1860; son of Levi and Eliza Ann Kelly Dillon; educated, common schools and High School, Pittsburgh, Pa.; married, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 5, 1896, Edna Virginia Jack; one son, James Edward Dillon, born, Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 29, 1904; entered R. R. service

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An Account of the Sufferings of Mercy Harbison – Indian Captivities

On the 4th of November, 1791, a force of Americans under General Arthur St. Clair was attacked, near the present Ohio-Indiana boundary line, by about the same number of Indians led by Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, and the white renegade Simon Girty. Their defeat was the most disastrous that ever has been suffered by our arms when engaged against a savage foe on anything like even terms. Out of 86 officers and about 1400 regular and militia soldiers, St. Clair lost 70 officers killed or wounded, and 845 men killed, wounded, or missing. The survivors fled in panic, throwing away their weapons and accoutrements. Such was “St. Clair’s defeat.”

The utter incompetency of the officers commanding this expedition may be judged from the single fact that a great number of women were allowed to accompany the troops into a wilderness known to be infested with the worst kind of savages. There were about 250 of these women with the “army” on the day of the battle. Of these, 56 were killed on the spot, many being pinned to the earth by stakes driven through their bodies. Few of the others escaped captivity.

After this unprecedented victory, the Indians became more troublesome than ever along the frontier. No settler’s home was safe, and many were destroyed in the year of terror that followed. The awful fate of one of those households is told in the following touching narrative of Mercy Harbison, wife of one of the survivors of St. Clair’s defeat. How two of her little children were slaughtered before her eyes, how she was dragged through the wilderness with a babe at her breast, how cruelly maltreated, and how she finally escaped, barefooted and carrying her infant through days and nights of almost superhuman exertion, she has left record in a deposition before the magistrates at Pittsburgh and in the statement here reprinted.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Capt. William Hubbell – Indian Captivities

A Narrative of the desperate encounter and escape of Capt. William Hubbell from the Indians while descending the Ohio River in a boat with others, in the year 1791. Originally set forth in the Western Review, and afterwards republished by Dr. Metcalf, in his “Narratives of Indian Warfare in the West.” In the year 1791,

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this,

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Biographical Sketch of William L. Rohbock

Rohbock, William L.; chief engineer, W. & L. E. R. R. Co.; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., June 7, 1873; son of Henry and Mary Rohbock; educated, Pittsburgh public and high schools; married, Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 15, 1901, Mary Newton Nuttall; three children; finished school in 1888; eight years various manufacturing concerns, including printing and lithographing companies

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