Oxford County ME

Biography of F. H. Penley

Fortunate is the community which had citizens with the substantial conservatism of practical business men and yet are forward looking in matters of new development and improvement. In the matter of towns and communities there is perhaps more truth in Ingalls’ statement that opportunity knocks but once at the door, than in its application to …

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, William

Allen, William, son of William Allen, was born at Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, March 31, 1822. He is a grandson of the Rev. Thomas Allen, the “fighting parson” of the noted Berkshire militia, who performed such conspicuous service under General Stark of Revolutionary fame. His father was a clergyman of Pittsfield, a scholar of eminence, …

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Pequawket Tribe

Pequawket Indians (a name of disputed etymology, the most probable rendering, according to Gerard, being ‘at the hole in the ground,’ from pekwakik). A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living on the headwaters of Saco River and about Lovell’s Pond, in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine. Their principal village, called Pequawket, …

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The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in …

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Fryeburg Academy

The question of a free grammar school in Fryeburg was first agitated by Rev. Wm. Fessenden, D. D., the first gospel minister settled in town. Through his efforts such a school was established in 1791, and was held in a little building at the foot of Pine Hill where fifty pupils were gathered. The year …

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Patrons of Husbandry

Fryeburg Grange, No. 197, was organized at Fryeburg Centre in Feb. 1888, with 18 charter members. B. Walker McKeen was chosen the first master, and has been followed in this capacity by John F. Charles, A. P. Gordon, John S. Ames, David Chandler, E. C. Buzzell, I. A. Walker, Simeon Charles and A. W. McKeen. …

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Grover Post

Grover Post, No. 126, was organized by sixteen veterans of Fryeburg and Lovell on Dec. 24, 1884. Wm. C. Towle was chosen first commander, Tobias L. Eastman and others completing the staff, the itemized list of which was burned in the recent fire. The membership increased until at one time there were sixty-nine members. For …

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Fryeburg Churches

Rev. Paul Coffin, D. D., of Buxton, visited this region in 1768, on a missionary journey “to Pigwacket” and was elaborately entertained at the mansion of Capt. Henry Young Brown and at the home of John Webster. At these and other places he delivered sermons, being the earliest ordained preacher, except Rev. Timothy Walker of …

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1907 Fryeburg Maine Census

The population of the towns of Fryeburg, Lovell, Sweden Stow and Chatham has been arranged in families, where that arrangement has been possible. In these families, in addition to the resident living members, the names of the nonresident members are included. It should be borne in mind that this plan does not include the names …

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The Sokokis Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in …

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