Location: Oxford County ME

saco valley settlements and families cover

Benton Family of Oxford County Maine

Dr. Joseph Benton came from Westmoreland, Conn. 1The editor is not aware of a township in Connecticut called Westmoreland., to Fryeburg with his family and practiced medicine there several years. He removed to Denmark previous to 1806, and after continuing in practice there nearly a quarter of a century he removed into Baldwin, near the Hiram line, where he d. Aug. 21, 1838, aged 76 years. He was a very skillful physician and took high rank among the practitioners of his day. Note: Dr. Benton was once called to New Hampshire during the ravages of a malady of a very

Gen. Daniel Bean and Wife

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch

Biography of Bezaleel Freeman Kendall

Bezaleel Freeman Kendall, like Elwood Evans, crossed the continent in 1853 with Stevens. He was a native of Oxford, Maine, and a graduate of Bowdoin College. His talents are highly praised by all his biographers. Evans, who knew him well, says that he possessed a grand physique, was a fine scholar, able writer, powerful speaker, hard student, and of thorough integrity, but ambitions, aristocratic in his feelings, bitter in his prejudices, and indiscreet in his utterances. The newspapers cannot too highly paint his contempt for the opinions of others, his bitterness of expression, his unqualified style of assault upon any

The Sokokis Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in council, “We received our lands from the Great Father of Life; we hold only from Him.” Their title was unquestionable and unmolested, they roamed the valley from their village at the Lower Falls (Saco) to the settlement on the great bend, on the intervales of

Early Settlement of Fryeburg, Maine

A grant of the township of Fryeburg was made to Gen. Joseph Frye by the General Court of Massachusetts for his valiant services in the expedition against Louisburg, and as commander of a regiment at Fort William Henry on Lake George, in 1757. This grant made Mar. 3, 1762, gave Gen. Frye the privilege of selecting a township six miles square, lying on either side of the Saco river between the Great Ossipee and the White Mountains. The territory selected is comprised mainly within the present town. The northwest corner proved to be within the State of New Hampshire, and

Fryeburg Industries

Unlike most of the wilderness of Maine, open grass laud were found in Fryeburg, offering excellent grazing pastures, but these intervals were not safe places for erecting homes. Lots were selected on the surrounding highlands and the first rude cabins of the pioneers were soon to be seen here and there dotting the landscape or more closely together at the “Seven Lots” or the Center. The first grist mill in town was built by John Evans on Wall brook near Lovewell’s pond, which privilege he was given together with two lots of land to erect and maintain a mill. This

Canning Factories of Fryeburg, Maine

The large canning factory at Fryeburg village was built by Asa 0. Pike, who rented it to the Portland Packing CO. about thirty years ago. After Mr. Pike’s death his heirs sold the factory to Tobias L. Eastman who carried on the business until the fall of 1905, when he sold to the present owners, H. C. Baxter & Bro. of Brunswick. This factory has a capacity of 1,000,000 cans of corn, requiring the product from 150 acres. The factory at North Fryeburg was built in 1890, by H. C. Baxter & Bro., the present operators. Capacity 1,000,000. M. F.

Fryeburg Churches

Rev. Paul Coffin, D. D., of Buxton, visited this region in 1768, on a missionary journey “to Pigwacket” and was elaborately entertained at the mansion of Capt. Henry Young Brown and at the home of John Webster. At these and other places he delivered sermons, being the earliest ordained preacher, except Rev. Timothy Walker of Conway, to preach the gospel in town. The CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH was organized Aug. 28, 1775, and Rev. W m. Fessenden, a graduate of Harvard, was ordained pastor and town minister on October 11th following. His salary was paid in Indian corn at three shillings per

Fryeburg Academy

The question of a free grammar school in Fryeburg was first agitated by Rev. Wm. Fessenden, D. D., the first gospel minister settled in town. Through his efforts such a school was established in 1791, and was held in a little building at the foot of Pine Hill where fifty pupils were gathered. The year following Rev. Mr. Fessenden, Rev. Nathaniel Porter, David Page and Jas. Osgood of Conway; Moses Ames, Jas. Osgood and Simon Frye of Fryeburg, and the preceptor of the school, Paul Langdon, were made the trustees of Fryeburg Academy by an act passed that year incorporating

Public Schools of Fryeburg, Maine

The first appropriation made by the voters of Fryeburg for the maintenance of public schools was in September 1777, at a meeting held for providing for assessing taxes on all the property in town. £60 was voted for schools. The following year but one school was kept in town, and as yet no house erected for its use. A committee was that year appointed “to see how and where a school house shall be built” and the sum of Y250 raised for education. From these meager beginnings there gradually developed a flourishing and elevating though not always harmonious school system.