New London County CT

New London County CT is bounded North by Windham, Tolland and Hartford counties, East by Windham county and the state of Rhode Island, South by Long Island Sound, and West by the county of Middlesex, Its average length from East to West averages about 26 miles, and it has a medium breadth of about 20 miles. This county possesses superior maritime advantages, having an extensive border on Long Island Sound, which affords numerous bays, inlets and harbors. Excepting a small section, principally in the town of Lyme, no portion of the county can be considered as mountainous, but it is generally hilly and elevated, and comprises a small proportion of alluvial. The hills and elevated tracts are considerably rough and stony. The lands in general are not adapted to grain culture, although upon the intervales and other tracts Indian corn is raised to advantage, and to a considerable extent. The principal agricultural interests depend very much upon grazing. The waters of the county are abundant and valuable. On the south it is washed more than thirty miles by Long Island Sound, part of its western border by Connecticut river, and the interior of the county is watered and fertilized by the Thames and its branches. The fishing business is more extensively carried on in this county than in any other section of the state, and is an important branch of industry. The manufacturing business is carried on to considerable extent in the northern part of the county, and is increasing. New London and Norwich are the capitals.

Account Of The Attack, Published By The Borough Authorities

ACCOUNT OF THE ATTACK, FURNISHED FOR PUBLICATION, BY THE MAGISTRATES, WARDEN AND BURGESSES.[14] [From the Conn. Gazette, Sept. 7th,] “Stonington Borough, Aug. 29, 1814.” “Mr.” Green–In relation to the extraordinary attack of the enemy, of the 9th inst., on this village, the public have been furnished with various accounts; and though the circumstantial and generally …

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Biographical Sketch of Ensign John Rowley

Ensign John Rowley, son of Moses (2) Rowley, was born about 1690 in Falmouth, Massachusetts, died in January, 1763, in Colchester, Connecticut. He married (first) September 11, 1716, Deborah, daughter of John and Mehitable (Rowley) Fuller, of East Haddam, Connecticut. She died January 30, 1752, aged sixty-three. He had a second wife. He removed to …

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Biographical Sketch of John Rowlee Fausey

JOHN ROWLEE FAUSEY – To the general advancement of the interests of the public schools of Massachusetts, and particularly of Springfield and West Springfield, Mr. Fausey has devoted the larger part of his career as a teacher and superintendent, and with results that are recorded as having enlarged the bounds and increased the value of …

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Names Of Volunteers, From The Connecticut Gazette

[From the Conn. Gazette, Aug. 24th.] The following is handed us as a list of the volunteers (tho’ presumed not entirely perfect,) of those who so bravely stood the brunt of the attack of Stonington Point:– Of “Stonington”:– Capt. George Fellows, Gurdon Trumbull, Capt. Wm. Potter, Alexexander G. Smith, Dr. William Lord, Amos Denison jun., …

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New London County Connecticut Cemeteries

Below is a complete listing of all available online New London County Connecticut cemeteries, with links to multiple cemetery transcriptions, gravestone photos, tombstone photos, official records, etc. Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. …

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The Battle Of Stonington, By Philip Freneau

BY PHILIP FRENEAU. “In an attack upon the town and a small fort of two guns, by the “RAMILLIES”, seventy-four gun ship, commanded by Sir Thomas Hardy; the “PACTOLUS”, 38 gun ship; “DESPATCH” brig, and a razee, or bomb ship,–August, 1814.” Four gallant ships from England came Freighted deep with fire and flame, And other …

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Letter From Capt. Amos Palmer To The Secretary Of War

[From Niles’s Weekly Register, Oct. 21, 1815.] DEFENCE OF STONINGTON. The defense of Stonington by a handful of brave citizens was more like an effusion of feeling, warm from the heart, than a concerted military movement. The result of it, we all know, and it afforded sincere delight to every patriot. But the particulars we …

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Cushman Family of Norwich Vermont

The Cushman family in New England dates from the year 1621, the first after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower, when Robert Cushman, who was a prominent leader and organizer of the Plymouth Colony, brought from England the earliest recruits and supplies to the wasted and famishing settlement. A century and a half …

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Martha Collins Todd Hill

HILL, Martha Collins Todd7, (John6, Timothy5, Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born April 1, 1831, marricd March 11, 1857, Rev. Charles Jenkins Hill, who graduated from Williams College, and Andover Theological Seminary. He was a congregational clergyman and held pastorates at Nashua, N. H., Whiteall and Gloversville, N. Y., Ansonia, Middletown and Stonington, Conn. Children: I. …

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Henry Geer

Geer, Thomas Henry; general insurance; born, Ledyard, Conn., Sept. 3, 1840; son of Nathaniela Bellows and Julia Davis Geer; educated, common schools, Ledyard, Conn.; 1854, Irving Institute, Tarrytown, N. Y.; 1857, State Normal School, Westfield, Mass.; graduate, 1861-1862, Norwich Academy, Norwich, Conn.; married, Poquetanuck, Conn., June 30, 1868, Fanny Halsey Brewster; one daughter, Mary Brewster …

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