Location: Kemper County MS

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned

Slave Narrative of Sam McAllum

Interviewer: Marjorie Woods Austin Person Interviewed: Sam McAllum Location: Meridian, Mississippi Date of Birth: September 2, 1842 Age: 95 Place of Residence: Meridian, Lauderdale County To those familiar with the history of “Bloody Kemper” as recorded, the following narrative from the lips of an eye-witness will be heresy. But the subject of this autobiography, carrying his ninety-five years more trimly than many a man of sixty, is declared sound of mind as well as of body by the Hector Currie family, prominent in Mississippi, for whom he has worked in a position of great trust and responsibility for fifty years

Biography of John W. Bocock

John W. Bocock, a retired business man at Sidney, has had an unusual range of experience varying from that of an old time telegraph operator to a cotton planter and farmer. Much of his active career has been passed in Champaign County but his business acquaintance is widely extended. Mr. Bocock was born near Washington Courthouse in Fayette County, Ohio, December 20, 1849. His parents were Elijah and Louisa (Gregory) Bocock, both natives of Ohio. His father came to Sidney and Champaign County October 12, 1856, and identified himself with the pioneer element in this county as a farmer. He

Poole, Elwyn L. – Obituary

Elwyn L. Poole, 85, of Pendleton, died Thursday, Jan. 23, 1986, at Delamarter Care Center. He was born Feb. 21, 1900 in Rio, Miss., the son of Richard and Inez Poole. He attended Emerson Institute of Technology in Washington, D.C., and worked for various agencies of the federal government. When he retired in 1962 he was employed by the General Services Administration as an air conditioning engineer. On March 8, 1924, he married Ethel Alline Bound of Bailey, Miss. They lived in the District of Columbia, Arlington, Va., Walla Walla and Phoenix, Ariz. Poole came to Pendleton in 1977 to

Choctaw Indians

Choctaw Tribe: Meaning unknown, though Halbert (1901) has suggested that they received their name from Pearl River, “Hachha”. Also called: Ani’-Tsa’ta, Cherokee name. Flat Heads, from their custom of flattening the heads of infants. Henne’sb, Arapaho name. Nabuggindebaig, probably the Chippewa name for this tribe, signifying “flat heads.” Pans falaya, “Long Hairs,” given by Adair. Sanakfwa, Cheyenne name, meaning “feathers sticking up above the ears.” Té-qta, Quapaw name. Tca-qtr£ an-ya-df, or Tea-qti ham-ya, Biloxi name. Tca-t a, Kansa name. Tetes Plates, French equivalent of “Flat Heads.” Tsah-tfl, Creek name. Choctaw Connections. This was the largest tribe belonging to the southern

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Minnie Sleeper

(See Cordery)– Lucile Jackson, born at Tanglewood, country home of her parents, August 7, educated in the public schools and Female Seminary. Married June 27, 1894, Gideon Daniels Sleeper, born October 5, in Liberty, Miss. He died August 7, 1916. They are parents of the following children: Julia Virginia, born April 22, 1895; Gideon Daniels, born June 10, 1897; Walter Jackson, born March 17, 1899; Martha Elizabeth, born January 19, 1901, married A. J. Rawlins; Minnie Louisa, born August 23, 1906. Gideon Daniels Sleeper Sr. was appointed Commissioner in 1909 and elected to the same office in 1910-12. Martha Elizabeth