Collection: Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico

Navaho Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Bithani (folded arms). A Navaho clan. Dsihlthani (brow of the mountain). A Navaho clan. Dsihltlani (base of the mountain). A Navaho clan.

Unknown Tribes of Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. We have listed these bands by location as we can not find any other connection to tribes. Mississippi Amicoa. Mentioned by Coxe (Carolana, 14, 1741) as a tribe on the Honabanou, an imaginary river entering the Mississippi from the west, 15 leagues above the mouth of the Ohio. It is probably an imaginary tribe. Amilcou. Mentioned by Iberville in connection with the Biloxi, Moctobi, Huma, Paskagula, etc., as

Patchoag Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Cannetquot. Described by Thompson (Long Id., 293, 1839) as a semi-tribe or family occupying in 1683 the E. side of Connetquot r., about Patchogue, in Suffolk co., Long Island, N. Y. In another place he includes this territory as part of that belonging to the Patchoag. The name seems to be a dialectal form of Connecticut, (J. M.)

Snoqualmu Tribe

Snoqualmu Tribe, Snoqualmu  Indians. A Salish division which formerly occupied the upper branches of a river of the same name in Washington and which numbered 225 in 1857. The remnant of these Indians is now on Tuliap Reservation, with other broken tribes. Sdok´-al-bíhw – McCaw, Puyallup MS. vocab., B. A. E., 1885 (Puyallup name). Sdo-qual-bush – Mallet in Ind. Aff. Rep., 198, 1877. Sno-kwal-miyükh – Gibbs in Cont. N. A. Ethnol., I, 342, 1877 (full form of name: miukh= locative) Snokwalmu – Gibbs, ibid., 179. Snoqualamick – Lane in Sen. Ex. Doc. 52, 31st Cong., 1st sess., 173, 1850. Sno-qual-a-mick

Chief Joseph 1877

Biography of Chief Joseph – Nez Percé

Chief Joseph. Hinmaton-yalatkit. The leader of the Nez Percé in the hostilities of 1877. His mother was a Nez Percé, his father a Cayuse, who re­ceived the name Joseph from his teacher, the missionary Spalding, who was with Dr. A. Whitman and who went to the Idaho country in the late thirties of the 19th century. Chief Joseph’s native name was Hinmaton-yalatkit (Hinmaton, `thunder’; yalatkit, ‘coming from the water up over the land.’ – Miss McBeth), but both he and his brother Ollicot were often called Joseph, as if it were a family name. Joseph was a man of fine presence and impressive features, and was one of the most remarkable Indians within the borders of the Union.

Nez Perce' Agency

Biographical Sketch of Mark Arthur – Nez Percé

A full-blood Nez Percé, born in 1873. His mother being captured with Chief Joseph’s band in 1877, Mark became a wanderer among strange tribes until about 1880, when he found his way back to the Nez Percé Reservation, Idaho, where he entered the mission school of Miss McBeth and soon began to prepare for the ministry. When the Nez Percé captives sent to the Indian Territory were returned to their northern home, Mark found his mother among them and cared for her until her death. About 1900 he was ordained by the Walla Walla presbytery and became pastor, at Lapwai,

Biography of Mikanopy

Mikanopy (`head chief’). A Seminole chief. On May 9, 1832, a treaty was signed purporting to cede the country of the Seminole to the United States in exchange for lands west of the Mississippi. The Seminole had already relinquished their desirable lands near the coast and retired to the pine barrens and swamps of the interior. Mikanopy, the hereditary chief, who possessed large herds of cattle and horses and a hundred Negro slaves, stood by young Osceola and the majority of the tribe in the determination to remain. Neither of them signed the agreement to emigrate given on behalf of

Biography of Osceola

Osceola (also spelled Oseola, Asseola, Asseheholar, properly Asi-yaholo, ‘Blackdrink halloer,’ from asi, the ‘black drink’, yaholo, the long drawn-out cry sung by the attendant while each man in turn is drinking). A noted Seminole leader to whom the name Powell was sometimes applied from the fact that after the death of his father his mother married a white man of that name. He was born on Tallapoosa river, in the Creek country, about 1803 his paternal grandfather was a Scotchman, and it is said the Caucasian strain was noticeable in his features and complexion. He was not a chief by

Biographical Sketch of Chief Bowlegs

Bowlegs (probably corrupted from Bolek). An inferior Seminole chief who was brought temporarily into notice in 1812 during the Indian war on the Georgia frontier. When early in that year King Paine, also a Seminole chief, at the head of sundry bands of Seminole and blacks, started on a mission of blood and plunder, Bowlegs joined him. A small force under Capt. Williams was met and defeated Sept. 11. Their force being considerably increased, they soon there after marched from the Alachua towns to attack Gen. Neuman, who had been sent against them with orders to destroy their towns. After