Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906.

Napochi Tribe

Napochi Indians. A tribe living near Coosa river, Alabama at war with the Coças (Creek) in 1560. They were probably a Muskhogean people, more nearly affiliated to the modern Choctaw.

Napissa Tribe

Napissa Indians (Choctaw: nanpisa, ‘spy,’ ‘sentinel’) A tribe mentioned in 1699 by Iberville as united with the Chickasaw living in villages adjoining those of the later, and speaking the same or a cognate language.  As they disappeared from history early in the 18th century, it is probably that they were absorbed by the Chickasaw, if …

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Mosopelea Tribe

Mosopelea Indians. A problematic tribe, first noted on Marquette’s map where “Monsoupelea” or “Monsoupera,” is marked as an Indian village on the east bank of the Mississippi some distance below the mouth of the Ohio.  In 1682 LaSalle found a Mosopela chief with 5 cabins of his people living with the Taensa, but whom they …

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Biography of Captain Jack – Kintpuash

Kintpuash ‘having the water-brash’ – Gatschet; also spelled Keiutpoos, but commonly known as Captain Jack. A subchief of the Modoc on the Oregon-California border, and leader of the hostile element in the Modoc war of 1872-73. The Modoc, a warlike and aggressive offshoot front the Klamath tribe of south east Oregon, occupied the territory immediately …

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Lillooet Tribe

Lillooet Indians (‘wild onion’). One of the 4 principal Salish tribes in the interior of British Columbia, situated on Fraser River around the mouths of Cayoosh Creek and Bridge River, on Seton and Anderson Lakes, and southward from them to Harrison Lake. Pop. 978 in 1904. Bands: Anderson Lake Bridge River Cavoosh Creek (2) Douglas …

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Kumbatuash Tribe

Kumbatuash Indians. The native name of the inhabitants of Kumbat, a rocky tract of land southwest of Tule or Rhett Lake, California, extending from the lake shore to the Lava beds. These people are a mixture of Klamath Lake and Modoc Indians, and are said to have separated from these after 1830. Alternate Spellings Cum-ba-twas …

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Jack Indians

Jack Indians. An unidentified tribe mentioned by Dobbs, who states that in 1731 they came to trade at the mouth of Albany River, Northwest Territory, Canada

Tamaroa Tribe

Tamaroa Indians. (Tamaroa – Illinois: Tamaro´wa, said to mean ‘cut tail,’ or, lit., ‘he has a cut tail,’ probably relating to some totemic animal, such as a bear or the wildcat; cognate with Abnaki tĕmaruwé. – Gerard.) A tribe of the Illinois Confederacy. In 1680 they occupied the country on both sides of the Mississippi …

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Ibitoupa Tribe

Ibitoupa Indians. A small tribe of unknown affinity, but the theory that they were connected with the Chickasaw has more arguments in its favor than any other. In 1699 they formed one of the villages mentioned by Iberville1 as situated on Yazoo River, Ibitoupa being near the upper end of the group between the Chaquesauma …

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Puyallup Tribe

Puyallup Indians. An important Salish tribe on Puyallup River and Commencement Bay, west Washington. According to Gibbs, their designation is the Nisqualli name for the mouth of Puyallup River, but Evans1 says the name means ‘shadow,’ from the dense shade of its forests. By treaty at Medicine Creek, Wash., Dec. 26, 1854, the Puyallup and …

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Chimakum Tribe

Chimakum Indians. A Chimakuan tribe, now probably extinct, formerly occupying the peninsula between Hood’s canal and Port Townsend, Washington. Little is known of their history except that they were at constant war with the Clallam and other Salish neighbors, and by reason of their inferiority in numbers suffered extremely at their hands. In 1855, according …

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Salish Tribe

Salish Indians. (Okinagan: sälst, ‘people’). Formerly a large and powerful division of the Salishan family, to which they gave their name, inhabiting much of west Montana and centering around Flathead lake and valley. A more popular designation for this tribe is Flatheads, given to them by the surrounding people, not because they artificially deformed their …

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Hoh Tribe

Hoh Indians. A band of the Quileute living at the mouth of Hoh River, about 15 miles south of Lapush, the main seat of the tribe on the west coast of Washington.  They are under the jurisdiction of the Neah Bay agency. Population 62 in 1905. Alternate Spellings Hohs – McKenney in Indian Affairs Report, …

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Quileute Tribe

Quileute Indians. A Chimakuan tribe, now the only representative of the linguistic stock, whose main seat is at Lapush, at the mouth of Quillaynte river, about 35 miles south of Cape Flattery, west coast of Washington. A small division of the tribe, the Hoh live at the mouth of the river of the same name, …

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Cathlacumup Tribe

Cathlacumup Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly living on the west bank of the lower mouth of Willamette River, near the Columbia, claiming as their territory the bank of the latter stream from this point to Deer Island, Oreg. Lewis and Clark estimated their number at 450 in 1806. They are mentioned in 1850 by Lane …

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Cathlacomatup Tribe

Cathlacomatup Indians. A Chinookan tribe residing in 1806, according to Lewis and Clark1, on the south side of Sauvies Island, in the present Multnomah County, Oregon, on a slough of Willamette River. Their estimated number was 170. Lewis and Clark, <em>Expeditions, II, 226, 1814</em> ↩

Canarsee Tribe

Canarsee Indians. Formerly one of the leading tribes on Long Island, New York, occupying most of what is now Kings County and the shores of Jamaica Bay, with their center near Flatlands. According to Ruttenber they were subject to or connected with the Montauk; however, is doubtful, as the Indians of the west end of …

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Bellabella Tribe

Bellabella Indians, Bellabella People, Bellabella First Nation (an Indian corruption of Milbank taken back into English). The popular mame of an important Kwakiutl tribe living on Milbank sound., British Cololumbia. Their septs or subtribes are Kokaitk Oetlitk Oealitk The following clans are given: Wikoktenok (Eagle) Koetenok (Raven) Halhaiktenole (Killerwhale) Pop. 330 in 1901. The language …

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Nakotchokutchin Tribe

Nakotchokutchin Indians, Nakotchokutchin People, Nakotchokutchin First Nation. A Kutchin tribe dwelling on the lower Mackenzie river, north of the Kawchodinneh, in lat. 68° north, lon. 133° west Their hunting grounds are east of the Mackenzie as far as Anderson River, and their chief game is the caribou. In former days they waged intermittent warfare against …

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Nootka Tribe

Nootka Indians, Nootka People, Nootka First Nations. A name originally applied to the Mooachaht of Nootka sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, and to their principal town, Yuquot, but subsequently extended to all the tribes speaking a similar language. These extend from Cook Creek to the north to beyond Port San Juan, and include the …

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