Category: Wyoming

Wyoming County Courthouse Addresses

Vital Records Services Hathaway Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7591 Fax: (307) 635-4103 Albany County Courthouse Grand Avenue Laramie, WY 82070 (307) 721-2541 Natrona County P.O. Box 863 Casper, WY 82602-0863 (307) 235-9202 Big Horn County Courthouse P.O. Box 31 Basin, WY 82410-0031 (307) 568-2357 Niobrara County P.O. Box 420 Lusk, WY 82225-0420 (307) 334-2211 Campbell County 500 South Gillette Avenue Gillette, WY 82716-4239 (307) 682-7283 Park County 1002 Sheridan Avenue Cody, WY 82414-3532 (307) 587-8500 Carbon County P.O. Box 6 Rawlins, WY 82301-0006 (307) 328-2668 Platte County P.O. Box 728 Wheatland, WY 82201-0728 (307) 322-3555 Converse County P.O. Box

Wyoming Vital Records

Vital records, as their name suggests, are connected with central life events: birth, marriage, and death. Maintained by civil authorities, they are prime sources of genealogical information; but, unfortunately, official vital records are available only for relatively recent periods. These records, despite their recent creation in the United States, are critically important in genealogical research, often supplying details on family members well back into the nineteenth century. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking. Vital Records Services Hathaway Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7591 Fax: (307) 635-4103 Birth  $12.00 MAIL-IN REQUESTS – Requests should

Treaty of May 7, 1868

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Fort Laramie, Dakota Territory, on the seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by and between the undersigned commissioners on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and head-men of and representing the Crow Indians, they being duly authorized to act in the premises. Article 1. From this day forward peace between the parties to this treaty shall forever continue. The Government of the United States desires peace, and its honor is hereby pledged to keep it. The Indians desire

Treaty of July 3, 1868

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Fort Bridger, Utah Territory,on the third day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by and between the undersigned commissioners on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and head-men of and representing the Shoshonee (eastern band)and Bannack tribes of Indians, they being duly authorized to act in the premises: Article 1. From this day forward peace between the parties to this treaty shall forever continue. The Government of the United States desires peace, and its honor is hereby pledged to keep

Treaty of February 18, 1861

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Fort Wise, in the Territory of Kansas, on the eighteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, by and between Albert G. Boone and F. B. Culver, commissioners on the part of the United States, and the following named chiefs and delegates, representing the confederated tribes of Arapahoe and Cheyenne Indians of the Upper Arkansas River, viz: Little Raven, Storm, Shave-Head, and Big-Mouth, (on the part of the Arapahoes), and Black Kettle, White Antelope, Lean Bear, Little Wolf, and Left Hand, or Namos

Treaty of April 29, 1868

Treaty with the Sioux—Brulé, Oglala, Miniconjou, Yanktonai, Hunkpapa, Blackfeet, Cuthead, Two Kettle, Sans Arcs, and Santee—and Arapaho, April 29, 1868

Treaty of October 17, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the council-ground on the Upper Missouri, near the mouth of the Judith River, in the Territory of Nebraska, this seventeenth day of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, by and between A. Cumming and Isaac I. Stevens, commissioners duly appointed and authorized, on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs, headmen, and delegates of the following nations and tribes of Indians, who occupy, for the purposes of hunting, the territory on the Upper Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, and who have permanent homes as follows:

Biography of Alonzo Beal

Few men have prospered in a greater degree than Alonzo Beal of Shawnee County. He came to Kansas when a boy, had a varied routine of experiences as a farm laborer, renter, western cowboy, and finally settled down to a carser which had brought him to a place where he is one of the largest land owners and cattlemen operators in this section of Kansas. He was born near Newtown in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, November 20, 1862, one of ten children, seven of whom are still living. His parents were Harlan and Cynthia (Ashor) Beal. His father, who was a

Biography of Edwin H. Wagner

Edwin H. Wagner, of the firm of Edwin H. Wagner & Company, certified public accountants of St. Louis, was born in Laramie City, Wyoming, October 6, 1873, a son of Henry and Susan (Cantwell) Wagner. The father’s birth occurred in Ohio and during the Civil war he served with the Halleck Guards and participated in the siege of Jackson and other important engagements that led up to the final victory that crowned the Union arms. The mother was a grandniece of General Joseph Warren, who commanded -the troops at Bunker Hill, where he gave his life for the cause of