Topic: Pedee

Pedee Indians

Pedee Tribe: Meaning unknown, but Speck (1935) suggests from Catawba pi’ri, “something good,” or pi’here, “smart,” “expert,” “capable.” Pedee Connections. No words of the language have survived but there is every reason to suppose that it was a dialect of the Siouan linguistic family. Pedee Location. On Great Pee Dee River, particularly its middle course. Pedee Village. No village names are known apart from the tribal name, which was sometimes applied to specific settlements. Pedee History. The Pedee are first mentioned by the colonists of South Carolina. In 1716 a place in or near their country called Sankey (perhaps Socatee)

The Pedee, Waccamaw, And Winyaw; The Hooks and Backhooks Indians

These small tribes lived on the lower Pedee and its tributaries in South Carolina and the contiguous border of North Carolina. Nothing is known of their language and very little can now be learned of their former daily life or their religious system of belief, as they were never prominent in history. For the “Hooks” and “Backhooks” there is only the authority of Lawson, who mentions them as enemies of the Santee, living in the earliest part of the eighteenth century about the mouth of Winyaw River, i. e., Winyah bay, South Carolina 1Lawson, John. The history of Carolina, containing

Pedee Tribe

Pedee Indians. A small tribe, probably Siouan, formerly living on the middle course of Pedee River, South Carolina Nothing is known of its language and little of its history. On a war map of 1715 its village is placed on the east bank, considerably below that of the Cheraw, about the present Cheraw, South Carolina. In 1744 they with others killed several Catawba, which led to their being driven from their lands into the white settlements. Two years later they and the Sara are named as tribes which had long been incorporated with the Catawba. In 1751 they were mentioned