Topic: Miami

Dawes Act

General Allotment Act or Dawes Act An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations (General Allotment Act or Dawes Act), Statutes at Large 24, 388-91,      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in all cases where any tribe or band of Indians has been, or shall hereafter be, located upon any reservation created for their use, either by treaty stipulation or by virtue of an act of Congress or executive order setting apart the same for their

Treaty of June 5, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this fifth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates representing the Miami tribe of Indians, viz: Nah-we-lan-quah, or Big Legs; Ma-cat-a-chin-quah, or Little Doctor; Lan-a-pin-cha, or Jack Hackley; So-ne-lan-gish-eah, or John Bowrie; and Wan-zop-e-ah; they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe—and Me-shin-go-me-zia, Po-con-ge-ah, Pim-yi-oh-te-mah, Wop-pop-pe-tah, or Bondy, and Ke-ah-cot-woh, or Buffalo, Miami Indians, residents of the State of Indiana, being present, and assenting, approving, agreeing to, and confirming

Treaty of October 23, 1826

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, near the mouth of the Mississinewa, upon the Wabash, in the State of Indiana, this twenty-third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, between Lewis Cass, James B. Ray, and John Tipton, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the Miami Tribe of Indians. Article I. The Miami Tribe of Indians cede to the United States all their claim to land in the State of Indiana, north and west of the Wabash and Miami rivers, and of the

Treaty of October 6, 1818

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the State of Ohio, between Jonathan Jennings, Lewis Cass, and Benjamin Parke, Commissioners of the United States, and the Miami nation of Indians. Article I.The Miami nation of Indians cede to the United States the following tract of country: Beginning at the Wabash river, where the present Indian boundary line crosses the same, near the mouth of Raccoon creek; thence, up the Wabash river, to the reserve at its head, near Fort Wayne; thence, to the reserve at Fort Wayne; thence, with the lines thereof, to the St. Mary’s

Treaty of August 7, 1803

At a council holden at Vincennes on the seventh day of August, one thousand eight hundred and three, under the direction of William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian nations north west of the river Ohio, at which were present the chiefs and warriors of the Eel River, Wyandot, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia nations, and also the tribe of the Kikapoes, by their representatives, the chiefs of the Eel River nation. The fourth

Treaty of October 23, 1834

Articles of a treaty between the United States and the Miami tribe of Indians, concluded at the Forks of the Wabash, in the State of Indiana, on the 23d day of October, 1834, by and between William Marshall, commissioner of the United States, and the chiefs and warriors of said tribe. Article 1.The Miami tribe of Indians agree to cede to the United States the following described tracts of land within the State of Indiana, being a part of reservations made to said tribe from former cessions, now conveyed for and in consideration of the payments stipulated to be made

Treaty of November 6, 1838

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Forks of the Wabash in the State of Indiana, between the United States of America, by her Commissioner Abel C. Pepper, and the Miami tribe of Indians on the sixth day of November in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty-eight. Article 1. The Miami tribe of Indians hereby cede to the United States all that tract of land lying south of the Wabash river and included within the following bounds to wit: Commencing at a point on said river where the western boundary line of the Miami reserve

Miami Reservation

The Miami reservation lies northwest from the agency, and is embraced within the area of the Peoria reservation. It is mostly prairie, fine agricultural and grass land. The Miamis have good farms, some quite large. They have their lands by allotment. Some of the fencing was done by the whites for grazing purposes. These Indians receive an annuity, which they use for improving their farms and stock; in fact, they are prosperous people, contented and happy. Some indications of coal are found on the north half of this reservation. There are but 67 Indians in this tribe; 50 speak good

Treaty of February 23, 1867

Articles of agreement, concluded at Washington, D. C., the twenty-third day of February, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, between the United States, represented by Lewis V. Bogy, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, W. H. Watson, special commissioner, Thomas Murphy, superintendent of Indian Affairs, George C. Snow, and G. A. Colton, U. S. Indian agents, duly authorized, and the Senecas, represented by George Spicer and John Mush; the Mixed Senecas and Shawnees, by John Whitetree, John Young, and Lewis Davis; the Quapaws, by S. G. Vallier and Ka-zhe-cah; the Confederated Peorias, Kaskaskias, Weas, and Piankeshaws, by Baptiste Peoria, John Mitchell, and

Treaty of Greenville 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.