Topic: Miami

Treaty of September 8, 1815

A Treaty between the United States of America and the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, Miami, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie Tribes of Indians, residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, and the Territories of Indiana and Michigan. Whereas the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, tribes of Indians, together with certain bands of the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, and Miami tribes, were associated with Great Britain in the late war between the United States and that power, and have manifested a disposition to be restored to the relations of peace and amity with the said States; and the President of the

Treaty of September 30, 1809

A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Putawatimies, Miamies and Eel River Miamies. James Madison, President of the United States, by William Henry Harrison, governor and commander-in-chief of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for treating with the said Indian tribes, and the Sachems, Head men and Warriors of the Delaware, Putawatame, Miami and Eel River tribes of Indians, have agreed and concluded upon the following treaty; which, when ratified by the said President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of

Treaty of June 7, 1803

Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by

Treaty of August 21, 1805

A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Pottawatimies, Miames, Eel River, and Weas. Articles of a treaty made and entered into, at Grouseland, near Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, by and between William Henry Harrison, governor of said territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for treating with the north western tribes of Indians, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delewares, Putawatimis, Miamis, Eel River, and Weas, jointly and severally by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article

Miami Indian Treaties

The Miami joined in or made treaties with the United States as follows: (1) Greenville, O., with Gen. Anthony Wayne, Aug. 3, 1795, defining the boundary between the United States and tribes west of Ohio river and ceding certain tracts of land; (2) Ft Wayne, Ind., June 7, 1803, with various tribes, defining boundaries and ceding certain lands; (3) Grouseland, Ind., Aug., 21, 1805, ceding certain lands in Indiana and defining boundaries; (4) Ft Wayne, Ind., Sept. 30, 1809, in which the Miami, Eel River tribes, and 1)elawares ceded certain lands in Indiana, and the relations between the Delawares and

Ni-a-có-mo, Fix with the Foot, a Brave

Piankashaw Tribe

Piankashaw Tribe – From a population of over 1,500 persons in 1759 to only 9 surviving members in 1936, all the children and grandchildren of George Washington Finley, the Piankashaw’s history mirrors that of many other mid-west tribes and is heavily woven with those of the Miami and Peoria tribes.

Wea Tribe

Wea Indians (probably a contraction of the local name Wawaagtenang, ‘place of the round, or curved, channel’ (Schoolcraft); possibly contracted from Wayahtónuki, ‘eddy people,’ from waysqtonwi, `eddy,’ both renderings coming from the same root. Wawaqtenang was the common Algonquian name for Detroit. (Cf. Wawyachtonoc). A subtribe of the Miami. They are first mentioned in the Jesuit Relation for 1673 as living in east Wisconsin. In the later distribution of the tribes of the confederacy they occupied the most westerly position. Allouez in 1680 found a Wea town on St Joseph River, Indiana. Marquette visited a Wea village at Chicago which

Miami Indian Villages and Towns

Among the Miami villages were: Chicago Chippekawkay Choppatee’s village Kekionga Kenapaconiaqua Kokomo Kowasikka Little Turtle’s Village Meshingomesia Missinquinieschan (Piankashaw) Mississinewa Osaga Pahedketcha Piankashaw (Piankashaw) Pickawillanee Raccoon’s village Seek’s village St Francis Xavier (mission, with others) Thorntown (Eel River Miami) Osage. A former Miami village on Wabash river, just west, of the Mississinewa, in Miami county, Ind. It was so called from its being the residence of an Osage Indian domiciliated among the Miami, and whose name appears in treaties as Osage and Osage the Neutral (J. P. Dunn, inf’n, 1907). In 1838 the site was included in an individual reserve

Pepikokia Tribe

Pepikokia Indians, Nation de la Gruë. An Algonquian tribe or band mentioned in the latter part of the 17th century as a division of the Miami. In 1718 both they and the Piankashaw were mentioned as villages of the Wea. That the relation between these three groups was intimate is evident. They were located on the Wabash by Chauvignerie (1736) and by other writers of the period. They are spoken of in 1695 as Miamis of Maramek rivers, that is, the Kalamazoo. A letter dated 1701 1Margry, Dec., iv, 592, 1880 indicates that they were at that time in Wisconsin.

Miami Tribe

Miami Indians (Chippewa: Omaumeg, ‘people who live on the peninsula’). An Algonquian tribe, usually designated by early English writers as Twightwees (twanhtwanh, the cry of a crane. Hewitt), from their own name, the earliest recorded notice of which is from information furnished in 1658 by Gabriel Druillettes 1Jes. Rel.1658, 21, 1858, who called them the Oumamik, then living 60 leagues froth St. Michel, the first village of the Pottawatomi mentioned by him; it, was therefore at or about the mouth of Green Bay, Wisconsin. Tailhan (Perrot, Mémoire) says that they withdrew into the Mississippi valley, 60 leagues from the bay,