Topic: Letters

Historical sketches of N.E. Fremont Twp., Cedar Lk., Ray, Clear Lk., Michigan border, Steuben County, Indiana

Historical sketches of N.E. Fremont Twp., Cedar Lk., Ray, Clear Lk., Michigan border, Steuben County, Indiana

Historical sketches of N.E. Fremont Twp., Cedar Lk., Ray, Clear Lk., Michigan border, Steuben County, Indiana. Included with these books is a separate manuscript called “William Duguid Descendants and History in America.” This manuscript starts at image 653 of 886 in volume 1. Volume 2 contains the Cedar Lake Congregation Session Records 1841-1892 and Deeds, Documents and Letters concerning the William Duguid descendants. Both volumes contain historical articles and remembrances concerning the area in Steuben County Indiana.

William Henry Lyttelton

Papers of William Henry Lyttelton 1756-1760

Letterbooks of William Henry Lyttleton 1756-1760: This collection contains papers relating to William Henry Lyttelton’s career as governor of South Carolina, including letters from officials in London; correspondence with other southern governors relating to Indian affairs, frontier defense, and boundaries; correspondence with military officers in America; and communications with the South Carolina Commons House and Council. A series of reports by Edmond Atkin, superintendent of Indian affairs in the Southern District, provides valuable information on the Cherokees, Creeks, and Chickasaws. There are 142 items, 1761-1766, concerning Lyttelton’s governorship of Jamaica, including material on the Negro insurrection of 1765 in St. Mary’s Parish.

Retribution for Previous Losses

Headquarters Expedition against Northern Indians, Camp on the Spokane River, W. T., 16 miles above the ‘Falls’ September 9, 1858. Sir: I remained during the 6th at my camp, three miles below the falls, as my troops required rest after the long march and battle of the previous day. No hostile demonstrations were made by the enemy during the day; they approached the opposite bank of the river in very small parties and intimated a desire to talk, but no direct communication was held with them, as the distance was too great and the river deep and rapid. Early on

Preliminaries Before the Battle at Tohotonimme

The events of Colonel Wright’s expedition against the Indians who opposed the advance of Colonel Steptoe are set forth in detail and at length in his own reports and letters. These appear in full in the following pages with the interjection of such information from other sources as the author deems expedient for the purpose of rendering the narrative complete. Preceding the reports of the expedition is also the pertinent correspondence leading up thereto. Because of the exactness and completeness of detail which characterize these reports, written from the field, as they were, during the progress of the campaign, their

John F. Randolph

Colonel Steptoe’s Report

On the day succeeding the return to Walla Walla, Colonel Steptoe dispatched the fol lowing report of the expedition to head quarters of the Department of the Pacific at San Francisco: “Fort Walla Walla, May 23, 1858. Major: On the 2nd instant I informed you of my intention to move northward with a part of my command. Accordingly, on the 6th I left here with C, E, and H, First dragoons, and E, Ninth infantry; in all, five company officers and one hundred and fifty-two enlisted men. Hearing that the hostile Pelouse were near Al-pon-on-we, in the Nez Perces land,

Fort Walla Walla in 1857

Indian Grievances and Camp Stevens Treaty

Long before the Indian buried his tomahawk and ceased to make war upon the white man, the government adopted the policy of inquiring into the causes of his grievances and in cases where such grievances could be conciliated without jeopardizing the interests of the government or of bonafide citizens, that step was usually attempted. In the investigation of these matters it was found that in some instances the difficulty grew out of some act of the government itself, interpreted by the Indians to be detrimental to their interests; in some, from the wanton encroachment of irresponsible citizens; and yet in

1758, February 20, Letter to His Excellency

Sir Your Dispatches of the 18th and 30th tell I received the 18th Just –f. James Holmes, The lak Affair of Sam Binn is Intirely forgot, and the Indians all satisfy’d, As to the Tellico People Jean Denture to Afsure you Excellency that they are Entirely Reformed, and behave Ex treamly well, and (Thank God) we at present live in Great Harmony, and Friendship with all the Nation. On the 15th selt arrived at this Fort the Little Carpenter, and the Great Warriour of Chotta, with their Party, they brought with them, two French men, and the Twighvee Indian woman

1758, November 27, Fort Loudoun

Sir this is to acquaint, your Excellency that the 25 jnstant two Runners came to latt me know that the great Warriour and judge Friend, (who had been to war Some time ago towards the French Fort) were at a Day’s Journey from the Fort; Accordingly yesterday, judge Friend with his Gang Came, and told me that the great Warrior and him, with the rest would wait on me, which they did, j recived them with the Honour that they expect on Such Occasion, j gave them an Entertainment, and the two warriors dined with me, they brought three Scalps,

1759, January 1, Fort Loudoun

Sir J have recived your Excellency’s Dispatche of the 15 December Sic Days before j recived from Lieut. Outerbriege a Copy of Mr. Duvalt’s Letters, and in the Same time, two of your Letters, one Octr. 27th, the other Novr. 18th immediately j sent to Old Hop to acquaint him that j had Letters to Communicate to him the next Day. Accordingly j went, and found him in the Town House, with many jndians. J thanck’d him in your Name for all the goods Talks that he had given from timt to time and hoped he would percerer in his

1758, March 2, Fort Loudoun

Sir Your Dispatch I received the 28th ultimate and immediately ordered Willm. Woodwareth to get himSelf ready. I am very Glad that the Earl of Loudoun has granted us Provisions, and would to God, it had be so before I come to this Place, it would have saved me great deal of trouble & uneaSiness. You acquaint me, Sir, that Mr. Stead is to Supply the Fort with ProviSions, I wiSh he may Send Send Some Body as soom as possible to Settle with with my store Keeper, and Send Some Meat Kind, for there is none to be got