Topic: Court

1665 A description of the towne of Mannados or New Amsterdam

The Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674

This work contains the earliest Dutch Records that have been preserved of the territory included in the present City of New York, the earlier ones having long ago disappeared. These are “The Minutes of the Burgomasters and Schepens of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674,” but contain a very few entries preceding the former date. They are contained in six folio volumes of manuscript, in the Dutch language, as spoken and written in the middle of the seventeenth century; and are preserved in the Manuscript room of the City Library in the City Hall. Until the earlier part of this century they remained as they were written. Then the first of the six volumes was translated for the municipality by a gentleman named Westbrook, but not well done, and with it his labors ended. The next step was not taken till 1848. On the twenty-second of January in that year, the Mayor approved a resolution of the Common Council, appointing Edmund B. O’Callaghan, M.D., the author of the History of New Netherland, and editor of the four volumes of the Documentary History of New York and of the eleven volumes of the Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York (two works published by the State), to translate the remaining five Dutch volumes.

York County Maine Deeds

York County Maine Registry of Deeds 1642-1737

At a meeting of the Maine Historical Society, held in Portland on the 23d of December, 1882, a communication was received from Mr. John T. Hull, proposing to publish the early volumes in the York registry of deeds and asking for the cooperation of the society. Messrs. Edward H. Elwell, James P. Baxter and William Goold were thereupon appointed a committee to present the matter to the legislature of Maine. The fruition of their collaboration are the following 20 volumes of York County Maine Registry of Deeds.

Early Probate Records of Hampton, N.H.

The early probate records of the Province of New Hampshire, from 1635 to 1771, have been published in nine volumes (vols. 31-39) of the set “New Hampshire State Papers” edited by Albert Stillman Batchellor, Henry Harrison Metcalf, and Otis G. Hammond. Originally published in the years 1907-1941 these books are available in many libraries throughout New Hampshire. Alphabetical list of probate records Abourn, George 1654 Blake, Timothy 1715 Boulter, John 1703 Boulter, Nathaniel 1695 Chapman, John 1705/6 Chase, James 1703/4 Chase, Thomas 1652 Cole, William 1662 Cotton, Seaborn 1684 Cram, Jonathan 1703/4 Cuddington, Stockdale 1650 Dalton, Philemon 1656 Dalton, Ruth

1926 Declaration of Intention

Maryland Naturalization Records 1906-1930

This database contains records of Maryland declarations of intention, petitions for naturalization, oaths of allegiance, and occasionally supporting documents such as certificates of arrival.  These records can be searched by the immigrant’s birth country, birth year, immigration year, and by his or her name. We also allow an additional search for witnesses, just to provide some additional match possibilities.  The best results are often obtained by typing a full name into the search box directly below.  Some records are labeled by immigration year, which is why some dates occur before the 1906-1930 time frame for this publication.

Montana Justices 1886-1889

Montana Justices 1886-1889 1886 Decius C. Wade, Chief Justices of Montana J. H. McLeary, Associate W. G. Galbraith, Associate T. C. Bach, Associate 1887 N. W. McConnell, Chief Justices of Montana J. H. McLeary, Associate W. G. Galbraith, Associate T. C. Bach, Associate 1888 Stephen De Wolfe, Chief Justices of Montana Moses J. Liddell, Associate T. C. Bach Associate 1889 Henry N. Blake was Chief Justice of Montana Bach, Associate De Wolfe, Associate Liddell, Associate W. J. Galbraith was born in Freeport, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and educated at Dartmouth College, N. H., graduating in 1857. He studied law at Pittsburg,

Court System of North Carolina Before the Revolution

In studying the development of a people nothing is more helpful than a correct understanding of their system of judicature, for here we not only learn their methods of administering justice, but, at the same time, we get an insight into their conception of justice itself. There is no question of government more vital to the individual than the mode in which the authority of that government is to be administered. There is hardly another function of government that touches the citizen at a point quite so delicate as the institution, which passes judgment upon his deeds and intentions. Hence

North Carolina Courts in the Royal Period

Such in general were the courts in North Carolina at the end of the proprietary government, and such they continued for several years thereafter. The change of the Colonial government from proprietary to royal had very little effect upon the courts. Only such changes were made from time to time as circumstances demanded. It now remains for us to note a few of the more important of these changes that were made prior to the beginning of the Revolution. The first one of importance occurred in 1738. An act was passed “by his Excellency Gabriel Johnston, Esq., Governor, by and

Chancery, Admiralty And Slavery Courts in NC

The three courts above mentioned constituted the chief agencies for the administration of justice, but there were three other courts of secondary importance. These courts, it would seem, were instituted not so much because of any actual need of them, as because similar courts existed in the mother country, but because of the additional fact that they furnished more offices to be filled by the friends and kinsfolk of the Lords Proprietors. The first of these to be mentioned is the Court of Chancery. This was, as in England, a Court of equity. Its duties do not seem to be

Will Of Lionell Chute

The will of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, dated 4: 7 mo: 1644, was proved in court at Ipswich 7: 9 mo: 1645. The original instrument has not been found, and the following copy is from the record in Ipswich deeds, book i, leaf 15. The fourth day of the eleventh month Anno Dm 1644 I Lionell Chute of the Towne of Ipfwch in New England Schoolmafter doe make & ordayne this my laft will & Teftament (revoking all form wills by me made.) Item I give vntd Rofe my wife for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling

Will of Richard Woodman

The nuncupative will of Richard Woodman of Lynn was sworn to in Salem quarterly court 30: 10: 1647. The following is a copy of the original on file in the office of the clerk of courts at Salem, volume I, leaf 89. The will of Richard Woodman of the Towne of Lynn defeced [deceased] as foloweth [follows] Being fpoken [spoken] to by Nicholas (Potter) to make his will Paid that he would make his will and being asked by John Gillow too whome [whom] he would giue [give] his goods faid [said] that he would giue [give] fower [four] pounds