Chinookan

Chilluckittequaw Indians

As reported by Lewis and Clark, the Chilluckittequaw Indians lay along the north side of Columbia River, in the present Klickitat and Skamania Counties, from about 10 miles below the Dalles to the neighborhood of the Cascades. Spier (1936) thinks they may have been identical with the White Salmon or Hood River group of Indians and perhaps both. In the latter case we must suppose that they extended to the south side of the Columbia.

Chilluckittequaw Indians Read More »

Cathlacumup Tribe

Cathlacumup Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly living on the west bank of the lower mouth of Willamette River, near the Columbia, claiming as their territory the bank of the latter stream from this point to Deer Island, Oreg. Lewis and Clark estimated their number at 450 in 1806. They are mentioned in 1850 by Lane

Cathlacumup Tribe Read More »

Multnomah Tribe

Multnomah Indians (Ne-‘malno-max, ‘down river’) A Chinookan tribe or division formerly living on the upper end of Sauvies Island, Multnomah County, Oregon. In 1806 they were estimated at 800, but by 1835, according to Parker they were extinct as a tribe.  The term is also used in a broader sense to include all the tribes

Multnomah Tribe Read More »

Skilloot Tribe

Skilloot Indians. A Chinookan tribe found by Lewis and Clark in 1806 residing on both sides of Columbia river in Washington and Oregon, above and below the entrance of Cowlitz river, and numbering in all 2,500 souls. The Hullooetell may have been a band of them . They were among the tribes almost exterminated by

Skilloot Tribe Read More »

Cathlamet Tribe

Cathlamet Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly residing on the south bank of Columbia River near its mouth, in Oregon. They adjoined the Clatsop and claimed the territory from Tongue point to the neighborhood of Puget Island. In 1806 Lewis and Clark estimated their number at 300. In 1849 Lane reported 58 still living, but they

Cathlamet Tribe Read More »

Chinook Indians

Chinook Indians. The Chinook were located on the north side of the Columbia River from its mouth to Grays Bay (not Grays Harbor), a distance of about 15 miles, and north along the seacoast to include Willapa or Shoalwater Bay. Ray (1938) makes a separate division to include the Shoalwater Chinook but it will be more convenient to treat them under one head. It is understood that they differed not at all in dialect.

Chinook Indians Read More »

Scroll to Top