Athapascan

Kwalhioqua Indians

Kwalhioqua Indians were located on the upper course of Willopah River, and the southern and western headwaters of the Chehalis. Gibbs (1877) extends their territory eastward of the Cascades, but Boas (1892) doubts the correctness of this.

Kiowa Apache Indians

Kiowa Apache Indians. The name is derived from that of the Kiowa and from the circumstance that they spoke a dialect related to those of the better-known Apache tribes, though they had no other connection with them. Also called: Bad-hearts, by Long (1823). (See Kaskaias.) Cancey or Kantsi, meaning “liars,” applied by the Caddo to …

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Kuneste Tribe

Kuneste Indians (Wailaki: ‘Indian’). The southernmost Athapascan group on the Pacific Coast, consisting of several tribes loosely or not at all connected politically, but speaking closely related dialects and possessing nearly the same culture. They occupied the greater part of Eel River basin, including the whole of Van Duzen Fork, the main Eel to within …

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Dakubetede Tribe

Dakubetede Indians. A group of Athapascan villages formerly on Applegate creek, Oregon.  The inhabitants spoke a dialect practically identical with that employed by the Taltushtuntede who lived on Gallice Creek not far from them.  They were intermarried with the Shasta, who, with the Takilman, were their neighbors.  With other insurgent bands they were removed to …

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Chilula Tribe

Chilula Indians (Tsu-lu’-la, from Tsula, the Yurok name for the Bald hills.)  A small Athapascan division which occupied the lower (north west) portion of the valley of Redwood Creek, north California and Bald hills, dividing it from Klamath valley. They were shut off from the immediate coast of Yurok, who inhabited villages at the mouth …

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Kwalhioqua Tribe

Kwalhioqua ( from Tkulxiyo-goa(‘ikc:kulxi, ‘at a lonely place in the woods’, their Chinook name.-  Boas) An Athapascan tribe which formerly lived on the upper course of Willopah river, western Washington.  Gibbs extends their habitat east into the upper Chehalis, but Boas does not believe they extended east of the Coast range.  They have been confounded …

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Chetco Tribe

Chetco Indians (from Cheti, ‘close to the mouth of the stream’: own name.-  J.O. Dorsey). a group of former Athapascan villages situated on each side of the mouth of and about 14 miles up Chetco river, Oregon.  There were 9 villages, those at the mouth of the river containing 42 houses, which were destroyed by …

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Tolowa Tribe

Tolowa Indians. An Athapascan tribe of extreme north west California. When first known they occupied the coast from the mouth of Klamath river nearly to the Oregon line, including Smith river valley and the following villages: Echulit, Khoonkhwuttunne, and Khosatumie of the Khaamotene branch, Chesthltishtunne, Tatlatunne, Ataakut, Meetkeni, Stuntusunwhott, Targhinaatun, Thltsusmetunne, and Turghestlsatun. They were …

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Umpqua Tribe

Umpqua Indians. An Athapascan tribe formerly settled on upper Umpqua river, Oregon, east of the Katish.  Hale 1Hale, Ethnology and Philology, 204, 1846 said they were supposed to number not more than 400, having been greatly reduced by disease.  They lived in houses of boards and mats and derived their sustenance mainly form the river.  …

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Taltushtuntude Tribe

Taltushtuntude Indians. An Athapascan tribe or band that formerly lived on Galice Creek, Oregon.  They were scattered in the same country as the Takelma, whom they had probably overrun.  In 1856 they were removed to Siletz Reservation, where 18 survived in 1877.

Naltunnetunne Tribe

Naltunnetunne Tribe (‘people among the mushrooms’) An Athapascan tribe formerly living on the coast of Oregon between the Tututni and the Chetco.  They were not divided into villages and had a dialect distinct from that of the Tututni.  The survivors are now on the Siletz reservation, Oregon. numbering 77 in 1877, according to Victor 1Victor, …

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Navajo Tribe

Navajo Nation, Navajo Indians, Navaho Indians, Navaho Tribe (pron. Na’-va-ho, from Tewa Navahú, the name referring to a large area of cultivated lands; applied to a former Tewa pueblo, and, by extension, to the Navaho, known to the Spaniards of the 17th century as Apaches de Navajo, who intruded on the Tewa domain or who …

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Tatsanottine Tribe

Tatsanottine Indians, Tatsanottine People, Tatsanottine First Nation (‘people of the scum of water,’ scum being a figurative expression for copper). An Athapascan tribe, belonging to the Chipewyan group, inhabiting the northern shares and eastern hays of Great Slave lake, Mackenzie Dist., Canada. They were said by Mackinzie in 1789 to live with other tribes on Mackenzie and …

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Lassik Tribe

Lassik (Las’-sik, the name of their last chief). A people of the Athapascan family formerly occupying a portion of main Eel River, Cal., and its east tributaries, Van Dozen, Larrabee, and Dobbin creeks, together with the headwaters of Mad River. They had for neighbors toward the north the Athapascan inhabitants of the valley of Mad …

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Tututni Tribe

Tututni Indians. An Athapascan tribe or group of small tribes formerly occupying villages along lower Rogue River, Oregon, and on the coast north and south of its mouth. Parrish in 1854 located 8 bands on the coast and 3 on Rogue river.

Wailaki Tribe

Wailaki Indians (Wintun: ‘northern language’). An Athapascan tribe or group of many villages formerly on the main Eel River and its north fork from Kekawaka Creek to within a few miles of Round Valley, California. After some fighting with the whites they were placed on Round Valley Reservation, where a few of them still reside. …

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Hupa Tribe

An Athapascan tribe formerly occupying the valley of Trinity river, California from south fork to its junction with the Klamath, including Hupa valley.  They were first mentioned by Gibbs in 1852; a military post was established in their territory in 1855 and maintained until 1892; and a reservation 12 miles square, including nearly all the …

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