Surname: Strong

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Over a period of many years Mrs. Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown, early member of Linares Chapter, D.A.R., collected genealogy of her forebears. It was her wish that her work be sent to the library of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. This collection was painstakingly copied, with some additions and corrections, maintaining the same general form as used in the original notes. Elizabeth’s family originated in England moving to New England in the 1600’s. Her family lines involve many of the early lines in Connecticut, Massachusets, and New Hampshire. The families are arranged mostly in alphabetical order, and contain information from a simple direct line descendancy, to more elaborate genealogy.

Major families researched include: Alverson, Arms, Arnold, Ballou, Barden, Barker, Barnard, Bassett, Belden, Benedict, Betts, Blakeslee, Blanchard, Bradstreet, Brigham, Bronson, Buckmaster, Bull, Butterfield, Carpenter, Clark, Clerke, Cooke, Coombs, Cornwall, Corbin, Curitss, Dickerman, Dickson, Doolittle, Downey, Dudley, Eastman, Easton, Errington, Evarts, Fairbank, Foote, Gilbert, Goodrich, Graves, Gregory, Groves, Hale, Hand, Hall, Hawkes, Hawkins, Hills, Holmes, Hopkins, Hoyt, Huitt, Hurd, Keayne, Keene, Lockwood, Lupton, Lord, Manning, Marvin, Mayo, Merriman, Miller, Morris, Morton, Mosse, Moulton, Munger, Needham, Parker, Parkhurst, Potter, Peck, Pettiplace, Purefoy, Priest, Rusco, St John, Scofield, Seymour, Sherman, Smith, Strong, Swinnerton, Symonds, Threlkell, Thorne, Ventriss, Wade, Watson, Weed, White, and Yorke.

W. H. Cary

Ancestry of William Hartley Cary of Brockton, Massachusetts

William Hartley Cary was a prominent and respected citizen and business man of the city of Brockton, where his death occurred Dec. 9, 1899. As a citizen he enjoyed the esteem of the entire community, in which industrial center he had for nearly a quarter of a century been an influential and successful factor in the development of its business interests. Mr. Cary was born Jan. 10, 1852, in Charleston, Maine, son of William Harrison and Abigail (Ingles) Cary. His parents were both natives of Maine, although his earlier paternal ancestors were among the early settlers of North Bridgewater (now Brockton). A record of that branch of the Cary family through which Mr. Cary descended, which has been traced in direct line back in England to the year 1170, follows.

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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