Surname: Sawyer

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield,

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson – Indian Captivities

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Wife of the Rev. Joseph Rowlandson, Who Was Taken Prisoner when Lancaster was Destroyed, in the Year 1676; Written by Herself. On the 10th of February, 1676, came the Indians with great numbers 1Fifteen hundred was the number, according to the best authorities. They were the Wamponoags, led by King Philip, accompanied by the Narrhagansett, his allies, and also by the Nipmucks and Nashaways whom his artful eloquence had persuaded to join with him. upon Lancaster: their first coming was about sun-rising. Hearing the noise of some guns, we looked out; several houses were burning, and the smoke

Augustus A. Bass, Nansamond

Nansemond Tribe

A brief history of the Nansemond Indians who resided at Portsmouth, Bowers Hill, and in general about Dismal Swamp, Virginia. Includes last names of living descendants.

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro

Biographical Sketch of P. Sawyer

P. Sawyer, proprietor of city blacksmith shop, was born in Oxford County, Me., in 1846. He enlisted in 1862, in Co. D., 28th Me. Vol.; was discharged in 1863, and went to Concord, Mass.; thence to Onawa in 1865. He was married in 1867, to M.T. Cunningham. They have four children-Edwin E., Altha M., Earl, and Margie. John W. Somers, druggist, was born in N.C. in 1834; removed to Champaign county, Ill., in 1843 and was clerk of the courts for several years. He enlisted in 1862 in the 76th Ill. Vol. as a private; was promoted to commissary sergeant,

Biographical Sketch of Leonard F. Sawyer

Leonard F. Sawyer, son of Josiah, married Mary B., daughter of Albert and Mary P. (Pollard) Adams, of Rindge, and has two children-Etta ML and Ella M., twins. He is a prosperous farmer and has three Summer cottages on Contoocook lake, which borders on his farm. He has a large collection of natural curiosities, antiquities and geological specimens.

Biographical Sketch of Cummings Sawyer

Cummings Sawyer, son of Josiah, married Elizabeth, daughter of W. Edward and Parnell Young, and has three children. He now resides on the homestead farm, on road 39.

Biographical Sketch of John W. Sawyer

John W. Sawyer is a native of Daviess county. His parents migrated from Tennessee to this county in 1847. John W. was born December 9, 1851, near Gallatin, and passed his early years with his parents on the farm. At the age of twenty-two he commenced farming for himself, but still made his home with his parents. In 1876 he purchased land in the northern part of Monroe township, where he remained three years, and then moved to the farm he now occupies, which is finely cultivated and well situated for farming. Mr. Sawyer was married, March 12, 1876, to