Surname: Reed

Biographical Sketch of Edward C. Reed

Edward C. Reed, son of Phinehas, was born here, March 8, 1793, and graduated from Dartmouth college, in 1812. He studied law in Troy, N. Y. and settled in Homer, N. Y., in 1816. He was admitted to practice in one court after another, until 1830, when be was admitted to the court of chancery. He was elected to the Twenty-second congress; was district attorney many years, and also judge. He married Amanda Weller, of Pittsfield, Mass., and reared a family of twelve children, four of whom survive him.

Biographical Sketch of Phinehas Reed

Phinehas Reed, a soldier of the Revolution, came to Fitzwilliam, from Westford, Mass., in 1784, built a tannery and conducted the business. His son Charles followed the same trade, and employed a large force of men in the manufacture of shoes, which were sold in the South. About 1838, he met financial reverses, and had to begin life anew. He was a claim agent for about fifteen years after 1850, and died in March, 1866, aged fifty-three years His son, D. H. Reed, was born February 8, 1819, and was brought up on a farm. He enlisted, October 11, 1861,

Biographical Sketch of General James Reed

General James Reed was the only one of the proprietors of Fitzwilliam, named in the charter of 1773, who located here. He organized three com. panies for the Revolutionary war, and was one of the three colonels from New Hampshire, who fought at Bunker Hill. He continued with the army until he was afflicted with blindness, when he returned to Fitzwilliam, but after. wards removed to Fitchburg, Mass., where he died.

Biographical Sketch of Abraham Reed

Abraham Reed is a native of Montgomery county, Ohio, born in the city of Dayton, August 29, 1819. He remained in the place of his birth, farming and attending school, until 1847. He was subsequently engaged in farming in the States of Indiana and Illinois during a period of six years, then came to Daviess county and worked at the carpenter’s trade one year. He enlisted in the Thirty-third Missouri Infantry Volunteers in 1862, was in active service and in many noted battles, among which were those of Helena, Sabin Cross Roads, Nashville; was also at Mobile Bay and Selma.

Biographical Sketch of A. Reed

Abraham Reed was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1814. His parents died when he was seven years old, which threw him on his own resources at an early age, and when he was fourteen he began to learn the blacksmith trade, and was employed in that business for five years. When he was twenty-three years old he moved to Coshocton county, Ohio, to Brown county, Illinois in 1863, and in 1865 to this county and settled where he now lives. He has a fine farm, and is engaged largely in stock-raising. Mr. Reed was married, in 1837, to

Biography of J. R. Reed

J. R. REED, of the firm of Wood & Reed, Gainesville, Missouri, has for the past twelve years been one of the most enterprising and successful business men of the county. He owes his nativity to Bradley County, Tennessee, where he was born January 21, 1861, the eldest child born to Alvin and Emeline (Wood) Reed, native Tennesseans, the former of whom was engaged in tilling the soil, and was killed near the close of the war, during which struggle he served in the Confederate Army. He was a son of John H. Reed, one of the early pioneers of

Stanford Chapman

Biography of Stanford Chapman

Missouri Few men have lived more quietly and unostentatiously than Mr. Stanford Chapman, and yet few have exerted a more salutary influence upon the immediate society in which they move, or impressed a community with a more profound reliance on their honor, ability and sterling worth. His life has not been marked by startling or striking contrasts, but it has shown how a laudable ambition may be gratified when accompanied by pure motives, perseverance, industry and steadfastness of purpose. Mr. Chapman came originally from Tennessee, his birth occurring June 3, 1825. He is the son of Benjamin and Mary (Cavett)

Biography of Walter J. Reed

WALTER J. REED. – A view of this gentleman’s residence in North Yakima, Washington, his hotel (the Reed House in Cle-Elum), together with portraits of himself and his estimable wife, is placed among the illustrations of this work. Although not a pioneer of Washington Territory, he has been a great factor in the development of Yakima and Kittitass counties. He built the first two-story business house in North Yakima, and is the founder of the town of Cle-Elum, in Kittitas county. He has also advanced a great many matters of substantial interest in both counties, and is one of the

Biographical Sketch of Charles W. Reed

Charles W. Reed is a farmer and successful stockman with home in section 16 of Philo Township. His rural mail delivery comes from Tolono on Route No. 48. Mr. Reed was born in Marshall County, Illinois, March 11, 1869, son of John Caldwell and Mary (Bell) Reed. Both parents were born in Virginia and in early life moved to Illinois. In 1879 John C. Reed came to Champaign County, locating on the farm in section 16 of Philo Township where his son Charles now resides. Both parents are now deceased. Their five children were named: Charles W.; Henry K., deceased;

Slave Narrative of Lucretia Alexander

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Lucretia Alexander Location: 1708 High Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 89 Occupation: Washed. Ironed. Plowed. Hoed “I been married three times and my last name was Lucretia Alexander. I was twelve years old when the War began. My mother died at seventy-three or seventy-five. That was in August 1865—August the ninth. She was buried August twelfth. The reason they kept her was they had refugeed her children off to different places to keep them from the Yankees. They couldn’t get them back. My mother and her children were heir property. Her first master was