Surname: Monroe

Masthead of the Lily in Seneca Falls

A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as The

Masthead of the Lily in Seneca Falls

History of the Seneca County New York Press

This history of Seneca County New York Press as transcribed from the History of Seneca Co., New York by Morrison in 1876. Provides a history of the printing industry in Seneca up until 1875.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties New York

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed,

Reverend Hugh Wilson

Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through Alabama

Earl Monroe

Private, Engineers, Co. E, 306th Reg., 81st Div. Born in Moore County, N.C., Dec. 7, 1895; son of A. R. and Mary C. Monroe. Entered the service at Carthage, N.C., May 28, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., and then to Camp Upton, N. Y. Sailed for France Aug. 1, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Received decorations as marksman. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 20, 1919.

Kenneth Monroe

Private, Inf., 54th Co. Born in Moore County March 2, 1893; son of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Monroe. Entered the service July 22, 1918, at Carthage, N.C. Was sent to Camp Hancock, Ga., July 22, 1918. Was Mustered out at Camp Hancock, Ga., Feb. 18, 1919.

Lauchlin Deaton Monroe

Private, Inf. 54th Co. Born in Moore County, July 29, 1895; son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Monroe. Entered the service July 22, 1918, at Carthage, N.C. Was sent to Camp Hancock, Ga., July 22, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Hancock, Ga., Dec. 18, 1918.

John W. Monroe

Private, Inf., Hdqrs. Co., 81st Div., 321st Inf. Born in Moore County, Feb. 22, 1887; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Monroe. Entered the service May 28, 1918, at Carthage, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Savier, S. C. Transferred to Camp Mills, N. Y. Sailed for France, Aug. 5, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 25, 1919.

Monroe, Harold R. “Hal” – Obituary

Harold R. “Hal” Monroe, 88, who with his wife founded the McEwen Bible Fellowship in the 1950s, died June 6, 2005, surrounded by family and his faithful dog, Ginger. His memorial service was June 17 at the Roseburg Christian Fellowship. He was born on July 28, 1916, at Orland, Calif. He was raised on a nursery in California and loved fruit. He worked for Douglas Aircraft for 26 years, retiring on June 6, 1976, as branch manager of telemetry and radio communications. He developed seven patented inventions while working for Douglas, including the air/sea rescue unit still being used by

Girls at the Fort Shaw Indian School

1910 Census of Fort Shaw Industrial Indian School

Fort Shaw Industrial Indian Boarding School opened in 1891 in Montana. It was discontinued 30 June 1910, due to declining enrollment. In 1904, it had a famous girls’ basketball team that barnstormed its way to St. Louis playing basketball and performing, and won the “World Championship” at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. This census was requested by the Department of the Interior for a listing of all the Indians enrolled at Fort Shaw Indian School for June 1910 in answer to Circular #448. Key to Relation Father – F    Mother – M Sister – S    Brother – B Aunt