Johnson

Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

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Emily Pauline Johnson, Mohawk Poetess, Six Nation Country

Mary Anderson Longboat, an Indian of the Six Nations Reservation, says the following of this remarkable woman: “We of the Six Nations Reserve, honour our Indian poetess, Emily Pauline Johnson. She is more than just a memory, for she lives today in her books which are read throughout the world. In her lifetime, her recitations

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Marriages of Orange County, Virginia, 1747-1810

Catherine Lindsay Knorr’s Marriages of Orange County, Virginia, 1747-1810 stands as a pivotal work for genealogists and historians delving into the rich tapestry of Virginia’s past. Published in 1959, this meticulously compiled volume sheds light on the matrimonial alliances formed within Orange County, Virginia, during a period that was crucial to the shaping of both local and national histories. The absence of a contemporary marriage register presented a formidable challenge, yet through exhaustive examination of marriage bonds, ministers’ returns, and ancillary records, Knorr has reconstructed a reliable record of these marriages.

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Wilson and Allied Families: Billew, Britton, Du Bois, Longshore, Polhemus, Stillwell, Suebering

William Wilson, the pioneer ancestor of this family, emigrated from Stewardstown, County of Tyrone, Ireland, in 1732, when 19 years of age. The Town of Stewardstown is in the parish of Donagheny in the province of Ulster and eighty-two miles northwest of Dublin, long noted for its very superior linen cloth.

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Families of Ancient New Haven

The Families of Ancient New Haven compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

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Abbot Family of New England

Arthur Abbot, Marblehead Perhaps removed to Ipswich, joined Winthrop 1634, in the settlement of that town, was living in 1671, and probably died before 1679. We know of issue, only Philip, whose descendants have tradition that he came from Totness in County Devon, where he left good estate of which for several years after migration

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Treaty of February 11, 1837

The said bands assent to the provisions of the treaties concluded on Aug. 5 and Sept 23, 1836, in which were ceded to the U.S. certain lands in the State of Indiana reserved for said bands by the treaties of Oct 26 and 27 1832, and hereby cede to the U.S. all their interest in said lands and agree to remove to a country that may be provided for them by the President of the U.S., SW of the Missouri river, within two years from the ratification of this treaty.

The U.S. agree to convey by patent to the Potawatomies of Indiana a tract of country, on the Osage river SW of the Missouri river sufficient in extent and adapted to their habits and wants.

The U.S. agree to purchase the “five sections in the prairie, near Rock Village” reserved for Qui-qui-to in the second article of the treaty of October 20th 1832 for the sum of $4,000.

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter

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