Surname: Hudson

Genealogy of George Spracklin

George Spracklin, son of Peter Spracklin and Elizabeth Andrews, continued living in Dudley Township, Hardin Co., Ohio. There he met Arloa Turner Minor and was married 9 April 1840, Knox Co., Ohio. In December of 1864 George bought land here in Shelby Co., Illinois in Drypoint Township. He paid $3680 for 200 acres south of Lakewood, Ill; in 1865, he and his family lived in Edwards County, Ill. before moving to Shelby County. By 1868 George owned 300 acres in Shelby County. Arloa, George’s wife, died in July, 1892 and is buried in Red Bank Cemetery, land formerly owned by George

Biographical Sketch of John Hudson

John Hudson and his wife, who was a Miss Allen, lived in North Carolina. They had six sons Isaac, Drury, Thomas, William, John, and Jesse. Drury and Isaac were in the revolutionary war. The latter settled in Georgia, where he married Polly Shipper. He afterward removed to South Carolina, and from thence, to Kentucky, and in 1818 he came to Missouri. The names of his children were Elizabeth, Nancy, Sally, John, Thomas, William, and Charles. Elizabeth married Lemuel Cox. Nancy married Garrett Ingram. Sally married James Owings. John was married three times; first to Lucinda Morris, of Kentucky; second to

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro

Slave Narrative of Measy Hudson

Person Interviewed: Measy Hudson Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: North Carolina Age: 79-80 Place of Residence: 1209 Jefferson St., Nashville, Tennessee “Wuz bawn’ in North Carolina en I’se 90 y’ars ole in November. W’en war broke out we kum ter Tennessee en hab bin ‘yer eber since. Wuz ‘yer w’en old Hood fi’rd de cannons. He said he wuz kum’n ‘yer ter Christmas dinnah, but he didn’t do hit.” “Mah white folks wuz named Harshaw. Marster Aaron Harshaw d’ed en we wuz willed ter his chilluns en dat we wuz not ter be whup’d er ‘bused in anyway. We

Biographical Sketch of Robert Hudson Jr.

Hudson, Robert, jr., Vergennes, was born in Brandon, Vt., in 1850, and settled in Vergennes, Vt., in April, 1885, when he commenced his stove, tin, and plumbing business. He was married in 1877 to Bridget Ryan, of Orwell, Vt. Robert Hudson was a son of Robert and Eliza (McCadden) Hudson, who were born and married in Ireland, and settled in Brandon, Vt., in 1850. Robert Hudson enlisted in the Fifth Vermont Regiment in 1861, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, and buried on the field. He left a widow and eight children, six of whom are now

Biography of C. C. Hudson

C. C. HUDSON. Many of the most active and enterprising residents of Newton County are natives of the same, and have here spent the greater part of their lives. In them we find men of true loyalty to the interests of this part of the State who understand as it were by instinct the needs, social and industrial, of this vicinity, and who have a thorough knowledge of its resources. They are, therefore, better adapted to succeed here than a stranger could be and are probably without exception warmly devoted to the prosperity of their native place. Mr. C. C.

Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little

Biographical Sketch of Andrew J. Hudson

ANDREW J. HUDSON. Although Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, is well known for the push, energy and enterprise of its farmers and stock-raisers, Andrew J. Hudson stands in the van in that direction, and through industrious and honorable efforts is now the owner of a good farm of 300 acres with 00 acres under cultivation. He is a native of this township, born December 14, 1853, and here grew to manhood and received his education. In the year 1875 he was married to Miss Mary M. Dupee, a native of Morgan County, Tennessee, and the daughter of William and Mariah

Biographical Sketch of John P. Hudson

John P. Hudson is one of Champaign County’s most successful farm owners and farm managers. He is a young man, and for all his success to date has the best years of his life still before him. Mr. Hudson was born in Sidney Township of this county November 12, 1885, a son of Albert and Mary (Deer) Hudson. His father and mother were both natives of Champaign County and his father has been a very successful farmer and land owner, but is now living retired. The mother died in 1893. There were five children in the family: Elsie, wife of

Biography of Joseph Kennedy Hudson, General

Gen. Joseph Kennedy Hudson. One of the ablest soldiers of Kansas and most determined fighter for the free-state movement, the late General Hudson will have a lasting fame not only for what he did in the trying years of Kansas’ youth, but also as founder and for many years editor of the Topeka Capital. It was his resourcefulness as a practical newspaper man and his wonderful ability as an editor and molder of public opinion that gave the Capital its wide influence and standing as a journal, and the history of the Kansas Press had no more notable figure than