Gibson

Gibson, Melda Mary Frances Nelson (Straub) Mrs. – Obituary

Last Updated on October 14, 2011 by Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Melda Mary Frances Nelson Gibson, 84, a former Baker City resident, died Aug. 16, 2005, at a Portland nursing home. Her graveside funeral will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Pastor Jack Bynum will officiate. Melda was born Sept. 16, […]

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Wintergreen Cemetery, Port Gibson, Mississippi

This survey of Wintergreen Cemetery, Port Gibson, Mississippi, was completed in 1956 by Mr. Gordon M. Wells and published by Joyce Bridges the same year. It contains the cemetery readings Mr. Wells was able to obtain at that date. It is highly likely that not all of the gravestones had survived up to that point, and it is even more likely that a large portion of interred individuals never had a gravestone.

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Biographical Sketch of Guion Gibson

Last Updated on March 10, 2012 by Guion Gibson came from Duck River, Tennessee, and settled in (now) Warren County in 1810. His children were Sarah, Rachel, Ellen, Samuel, Joseph, John, Polly, Guion, Jr., and James. Sarah married Thomas Kennedy. Rachel married Lawrence Sitter. Ellen married Phillip Sitter. Samuel married Tabitha Kennedy. Joseph married Elizabeth

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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1914 Eastern Shawnee Census

The 1914 census record of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe from the Quapaw Agency was taken on June 30, 1914, in Indian Territory, which is now Oklahoma. The Eastern Shawnee Tribe primarily resides in northeastern Oklahoma, having separated from other Shawnee groups in the 19th century to establish their community in this region. Recognized as a federally recognized tribe, the Eastern Shawnee have their own government and tribal structure. The purpose of the 1914 census was to maintain an official record of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe members as part of the U.S. government’s broader efforts to document Native American populations. This census provides detailed information about individual tribe members, including their names, ages, sex, family relationships, allotment numbers, and roll numbers.

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History of Minneapolis and Hennepin County, Minnesota

The aim of this history was to present in a permanent form the key incidents in the history of Minneapolis, from its earliest settlement to its publication in 1895. The primary facts and events recounted were mostly obtained from living witnesses and participants. It was rare for a city with more than two hundred thousand inhabitants to have so many of its first settlers still alive. The city’s growth had been so extraordinary and unprecedented that many of its earliest settlers remained. Some information was also gleaned from the notes left by now-deceased writers who witnessed the events described. Great care was taken to verify the accuracy of all facts and incidents mentioned. While it might have been too much to hope that the work was entirely free from errors, it was confidently believed that any such errors were few and insignificant.

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