Surname: Alexander

Biography of Captain Charles Alexander

Captain Charles Alexander was born in Mecklenburg county, N.C., January 4th, 1753. He first entered the service of the United States as a private in July, 1775, in the company of Captain William Alexander, and Colonel Adam Alexander’s regiment, General Rutherford commanding, and marched across the Blue Ridge Mountains against the Cherokee Indians. The expedition was completely successful; the Indians were routed, and their towns destroyed. He next served as a private for two months, commencing in January, 1776, known as the “Snow Campaign,” in Captain William Alexander’s company, and Colonel Thomas Folk’s regiment, and marched to Rayburn’s creek, where

Biographical Sketch of John Alexander

“John Alexander”, son of James Alexander, was in active service for upwards of five years. He was the husband of Mrs. Susanna Alexander, long known and highly esteemed in Mecklenburg county as the ministering angel, who was eminently instrumental in saving the life of Captain Joseph Graham, after he was cut down by the British cavalry, near Sugar Creek Church, and left by them, supposed to be dead. She found him by the roadside, conducted him to her house, dressed his wounds, made by ball and sabre, and tenderly cared for him during the night. On the next day, his

Biographical Sketch of Dan Alexander

“Dan Alexander”, who moved to Hardeman county, Tenn., was born in Mecklenburg county, in March, 1757. He first entered the service in 1778, for three months, in Captain William Alexander’s company, (commonly called “Black Bill Alexander,”) and Colonel Irwin’s regiment. In 1780, he served under Captain Thomas Alexander to assist in guarding the public magazine in Charlotte. In this same year he served in the expedition to Ramsour’s Mill, under General Rutherford, and afterward, against Tories assembled in the forks of the Yadkin river, captured several and conveyed them to Salisbury jail. Soon afterward, he joined the command of Colonel

Biography of Major Thomas Alexander

Major Thomas Alexander, born in 1753, was one of the earliest and most unwavering patriots of Mecklenburg county. He first entered the service in 1775, as a private, in Captain John Springs’ company, and marched to the head of the Catawba river, to assist in protecting the frontier settlements, then greatly suffering from the murderous and depredating incursions of the Cherokee Indians. In 1775 he also volunteered in Captain Ezekiel Polk’s company, and marched against the Tories assembled at the post of Ninety, in South Carolina. In 1776 he volunteered in Captain William Alexander’s company, under Colonels Adam Alexander and

Biography of Captain William Alexander

Captain William Alexander was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1749. He was long and well known in Mecklenburg county, N.C., among numerous other persons bearing the same name, as “Capt. Black Bill Alexander,” from being the reputed leader of a small band of ardent patriots who, in 1771, “blackened their faces”, and destroyed the king’s powder, on its way to Hillsboro, to obey the behests of a cruel and tyrannical governor. (For further particulars, see sketch of “Black Boys” of Cabarrus County.) He first entered the service of the United States as captain of a company, in

Biographical Sketch of Elijah Alexander

Elijah Alexander, son of William Alexander, blacksmith, was born in Mecklenburg county, N.C., in 1760. In 1819, he moved to Maury county, Tenn., where he died at a good old age. In March, 1780, Colonel Thomas Polk called out detachments from the nearest companies of militia to serve as a guard over the public powder placed in the magazine in Charlotte. He then volunteered for three months under Captain Thomas Alexander. After Cornwallis crossed the Catawba River at Cowan’s Ford, on the 1st of February, 1781, at which place General Davidson was killed, a call was made for more men

Biographical Sketch of Adam Alexander

“Adam Alexander” was chiefly known by his military services. He was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of a battalion of minute men, with Thomas Polk as Colonel, and Charles M’Lean as Major, by the Provincial Council held at Johnston Court-house, on the 18th of December, 1775; and Colonel of Mecklenburg county, with John Phifer as Lieutenant Colonel, and John Davidson and George A. Alexander as Majors, by the Provincial Congress, held at Halifax on the 4th of April, 1776. He was a brave and energetic officer; and his name will be found in nearly every expedition which marched from Mecklenburg county to

Biography of Abraham Alexander

“Abraham Alexander”, the Chairman of the Mecklenburg Convention of the 19th and 20th of May, 1775, was born in 1718, and was an active and influential magistrate of the county before and after the Revolution, being generally the honored chairman of the Inferior Court. He was a member of the popular branch of the Assembly in 1774-’75, with Thomas Polk as an associate; also one of the fifteen trustees of Queen’s Museum, which institution, in 1777, was transformed into “Liberty Hall Academy.” After the involuntary retreat of Josiah Martin, the royal Governor, in June, 1775, from the State, its government

Biography of John McKnitt Alexander

“John McKnitt Alexander”, of Scotch-Irish ancestors, was born in Pennsylvania, near the Maryland line, in 1733. He served as an apprentice to the trade of tailor, and when his apprenticeship expired, at the age of twenty-one, he emigrated to North Carolina, joining his kinsmen and countrymen in seeking an abode in the beautiful champaign between the Yadkin and Catawba rivers–the land of the deer and the buffalo; of “wild pea-vines” and cane-brakes, and of peaceful prosperity. In 1759 he married Jane Bain, of the same race, from Pennsylvania, and settled in Hopewell congregation. Prospered in his business, he soon became

Biographical Sketch of Hezekiah Alexander

“Hezekiah Alexander” was more of a statesman than a soldier. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1728. He was appointed a member of the Committee of Safety for the Salisbury district by the Provincial Congress which met at Hillsboro on the 21st of August, 1775, with General Griffith Rutherford, John Brevard, Benjamin Patton and others–a position of much responsibility and power. He was appointed by the Provincial Congress, in April, 1776, with William Sharpe, of Rowan county, on the Council of Safety. He was elected a member of the Provincial Congress from Mecklenburg county, which met at Halifax on November