Location: Wyandotte County KS

Biography of Frederick E. Dillenbeck, M. D.

Frederick E. Dillenbeck, M. D.,of El Dorado, had attained as much prominence in the fleld of medicine and surgery as others of his fantily have gained in the breeding and raising of some of the finest trotting horses known in Kansas or anywhere in the country. Doctor Dilleubeck, who had practiced medicine at El Dorado for twenty years, is local and dispensing surgeou for the Missouri Pacific and the Santa. Fe Railway companies, is consulting surgeon for the Rock Island Railroad Company, is medieal examiner for a number of old line life insurance companies, is a member of the County

Biography of James Willis Gleed

James Willis Gleed, general attorney for the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company of St. Louis, was born at Morrisville, Vermont, March 8, 1859. His father, Thomas Gleed, now deceased, was a native of England, who came to America during the ’30s, settling at first in Canada, but later he removed to northern Vermont, where he resided to the time of his death in 1861, when he was but thirty-five years of age. In early manhood he had wedded Cornelia Fisk, a native of the Green Mountain state and a representative of an old New England family that was established in Massachusetts

Biography of Ira I. Cammack

Ira I. Cammack, who has devoted the greater part of his life to educational work, has done valuable service in the capacity of superintendent of schools in Kansas City, which position he still holds. He was born at Deming, Hamilton county, Indiana, on the 16th of February, 1858, his parents being James and Edith J. Cammack, who were pioneer settlers of eastern Indiana, taking up their abode in Randolph county. They held birthright membership in the Friends church and were prominently identified therewith throughout their entire lives. The father brought the first steam sawmills to central Indiana. Joseph Pearson, the

Biography of William Waddell Duke, M.D.

Dr. William Waddell Duke, physician of Kansas City, was born in Lexington, Missouri, a son of Henry Buford and Susan (Waddell) Duke, the former a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and the latter of Lexington, Missouri. The father, now retired, was a manufacturer of farm implements and harness of the firm of Buford & George Manufacturing Company. Dr. Duke attended the Kansas City schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 1901. He next entered Yale University and gained his Ph. B. degree in 1904, while in 1908 Johns Hopkins University conferred upon him the M. D. degree,

Biography of Holmes Dysinger, Rev.

Rev. Holmes Dysinger has for the past twelve years been connected with the Western Theological Seminary of the Lutheran Church at Atchison, and since 1910 had been dean of the seminary. He had spent more than thirty years in the work of the church as a minister and as an educator, and had been connected with prominent schools and pastorates in nearly all parts of the country. Mr. Dysinger is of an old Pennsylvania family and was born at Mifflin, that state, March 26, 1853. The Dysingers’ original home was in Southern Germany. They came across the ocean and settled

Biographical Sketch of Thomas J. Vanderslice

Thomas J. Vanderslice, a prominent figure in the earlier affairs of the Great Nemaha Indian Agency, a public man of the territory and state, was a native of Scott County, Kentucky, born in 1827. He enlisted from his native state as a soldier for the Mexican war, but never saw service. In 1853 he came to Kansas and stopped at the Great Nemaha Agency, where his father, Maj. Daniel Vanderslice, had just assumed the agency there of the Iowas, Sacs, Foxes and Kickapoos, and from 1854 to 1856 served as farmer and miller for the Sacs and Foxes, He was

Biography of Albe B. Whiting

Albe B. Whiting, a resident of Topeka for the past forty years, is distinguished as being one of the few survivors of the great free-soil struggle in Kansas during the decade of the ’50m. His home had been in Kansas since 1856, and few men now living have more interesting-experiences to connect them with Kansas history. Of New England birth and ancestry, he was born in Lamoille County, Vermont, November 10, 1835, and had already Imssed the fourscoro milestone on life’s joursey. His parents were Harris and Mary (Dodge) Whiting. His father was of old English celonial ancestry, and died

Biography of Ira Puderbaugh, M.D.

Ira Puderbaugh, M. D. The second physician in practice at Ozawkis was Dr. Aaron Puderbaugh, and in that same locality his son Dr. Ira Puderbaugh had handled the bulk of the professional work for the past fifteen years. Ozawkie is the native town of Dr. Ira Puderbaugh, where he was born March 5, 1878. His ancestors were Germans who immigrated to Pennsylvania in very early times. His grandfather was born in Pennsylvania in 1810, afterwards moved to Western Ohio, from there to Indiana, and finally came to Kansas, where be lived retired until his death at Ozawkie in 1883. Dr. Aaron

Biography of William H. Manser, M. D.

William H. Manser, M. D.,had that splendid satisfaction which comes to the man who found himself in a congenial vocation early in life and had steadily broadened and improved his service and capacity for doing good. Dr. Manser is now the oldest physician in point of continnous service at Burden, where he had practiced thirty-three years. Though of New England ancestry, the Mansers having located in Massachusetts in Colonial times, Dr. Manser is a native of old Virginia, born at Beckley in what was then simply Western Virginia and as a result of the Civil war became the State of West Virginia.

Biographical Sketch of S. T. Blades, M. D.

S. T. Blades, M. D. The problems of health are really the problems of life and must pertain to all questions of human interest. Useless is wealth or station and vain are great achievements if good health is lacking. Thus comes the great value placed on the services of that body of noble men who have dedicated their lives to the healing art. The most necessary resident in any community is the physician, although he probably is never fully appreciated and seldom does he claim any foremost place, although his usefulness entitles him to it. Among the well known medical