Washington D.C.

Memoirs of the Harkins Family

John Harkins, a white man, is the father of the Harkins family of Choctaws. His advent to the Choctaw nation was, as near as can be ascertained, about the year 1800 or soon afterwards. He was a man of high-toned principles, and contemporary with the Folsoms, Nails, Pitchlynns, LeFlores, Durants, Cravats, Crowders, and others of the long ago, …

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David Peck Todd of Amherst MA

David Peck Todd7, (Sereno E.6, Josiah5, Abner4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 19, 1854, married March 5, 1880, Mabel, only child of Eben Jenks and Mary Alden (Wilder) Loomis, who was born Nov. 10, 1856, in Cambridge, Mass. He is a graduate of Amherst College and a descendant of the celebrated divine, Jonathan Edwards. After …

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Biographical Sketch of Harold E. Smith

Smith, Harold E.; patent lawyer; born, Lebanon, N. H., May 2, 1882; son of Wilbur F. and Marie Antoinette Sargent Smith; educated, Dartmouth College, A. B., 1903, A. M., 1906; National University Law School, LL. B., 1908; LL. M., 1909; George Washington University, M. P. L., 1909; married, Washington, D. C. Oct. 5, 1909, Annie …

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Biographical Sketch of Hubert Bruce Fuller

Fuller, Hubert Bruce; lawyer, author; born, Derby, Conn., June 15. 1880; son of Robert Bruce and Harriet A. Prentice Fuller; A. B., Yale, 1901; A. M., 1904, LL. M., 1903, Columbian (now George Washington) University; awarded Cobden Club medal (England), 1901; married, Florence B. Dennis, of Chanute, Kan., May 25, 1910; practiced law at Cleveland …

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Slave Narrative of Tom Rosboro

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Tom Rosboro Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Age: 79 Ex-Slave 79 Years Old Tom Rosboro lives with his daughter, Estelle Perry, in a three-room frame house, on Cemetery Street, Winnsboro, S.C. The house stands on a half-acre plot that is used for garden truck. Estelle owns the fee in the …

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Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

Biography of William F. M. Arny

Kansas has produced no more eceentric, generous or beloved character than William F. M. Arny. Although not a native of the state, he was a son in all that stands for its independence and humanity. He was born in the District of Columbia, March 6, 1813, and after graduating from Bethany College, West Virginia, acted …

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Slave Narrative of Anderson Whitted

Interviewer: Emily Hobson Person Interviewed: Anderson Whitted Location: Rockville, Indiana Place of Birth: Orange County, North Carolina Age: 88 Special Assignment Emily Hobson Dist. #3 Parke County INTERVIEW WITH ANDERSON WHITTED, COLORED EX-SLAVE, OF ROCKVILLE, INDIANA Mr. Whitted will be 89 years old next month October 1937. He was born in Orange County, North Carolina. …

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Fort Gibson Conference with the Indians, 1834

One of the most important Indian conferences ever held in the Southwest, occurred at Fort Gibson in 1834 for it paved the way for agreements and treaties essential to the occupation of a vast country by one hundred thousand members of the Five Civilized Tribes emigrating from east of the Mississippi; to the security of settlers and travelers in a new country; to development of our Southwest to the limits of the United States and beyond and contributed to the subsequent acquisition of the country to the coast, made known to us by the pioneers to Santa Fe and California traveling through the region occupied by the “wild” Indians who, at Fort Gibson, gave assurances of their friendship. It is true, these assurances were not always regarded, and many outrages were afterwards committed on the whites and by the whites, but the Fort Gibson conference was the beginning and basis upon which ultimately these things were accomplished.

Biographical Sketch of Waldo G. Gideon

WALDO G. GIDEON is one of the rising young attorneys of Springfield, who began the practice of law at the Greene County bar under the favorable circumstances of possessing an excellent general education and an accurate knowledge of law, besides coming from a family well known throughout southwest Missouri. He was born in Christian County, …

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Slave Narrative of James Calhart James

Person Interviewed: James Calhart James Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Residence: 2460 Druid Hill Ave., Baltimore, MD Reference: Personal interview with James Calhart James, ex-slave, at his home, 2460 Druid Hill Ave., Baltimore. “My father’s name was Franklin Pearce Randolph of Virginia, a descendant of the Randolphs of Virginia who migrated to South Carolina and …

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter …

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Slave Narrative of Mary Moriah Anne Susanna James

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Mary James Date of Interview: Sept. 23, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Residence: 618 Haw St., Baltimore, MD Reference: Personal interview with Mary James, ex-slave, Sept. 23, 1937, at her home, 618 Haw St., Baltimore, Md. “My father’s name was Caleb Harris James, and my mother’s name was Mary Moriah. …

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Biography of Luther C. Tibbets

Luther C. Tibbets was born in South Berwick, York County, Maine, June 26, 1820. His father, James Tibbets, was a native of the same State and a farmer by occupation. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and reared a farmer until seventeen years of age. He then located in Portsmouth, …

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Biography of Samuel R. Langworthy

Samuel R. Langworthy is one of the most progressive and energetic real-estate and insurance men of Riverside. He established his office and business in May 1888, at a time when the “boomers ” were rapidly retiring from the field of real estate in disgust. He is not a boomer,” but is a wide awake, energetic …

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