Location: Wareham Massachusetts

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d of Brockton Massachusetts

Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d, who belonged to the older school of shoe manufacturers in Brockton, and whose industry and integrity, coupled with his executive ability and iron determination, won him success in his undertakings, died at Cory Hill hospital, Boston, Nov. 6, 1908, aged seventy-five years. He was a descendant of Samuel Packard, the first of the name in America, who with his wife and child came from Windham, near Hingham, England, in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, and settled first at Hingham, Mass., in 1638, thence removing to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the early settlers, and where he was a tavern-keeper

Genealogy of Edward A. Gammons of Wareham, MA

EDWARD A. GAMMONS of Wareham, well-known citizen and banker, is a native of that section of the State, born in South Wareham Jan. 15, 1842, son of William and Deborah Bryant (Gallt) Gammons. The Gammons family is supposed to be of English origin, and is found in many parts of New England. The name has been variously spelled – Gammons, Gammon, Gamon, Gamons and Gamans. One Philip Gammon, a fisherman, of Casco, and later of Portsmouth, N. H., was married prior to 1690, his wife being the eldest daughter of John Parrott; and there was Robert Gammon, of Pemoquid, who

Noble Parker Swift

Descendants of William Swift of Sandwich, MA

William Swift, the founder of the family on Cape Cod, was a native of Bocking, County of Essex, England, and came to New England in 1634, stopping first at Watertown, of which he was a proprietor in 1636. He sold his property there in 1637 and removed to Sandwich, where he spent the remainder of his life and where he died about 1641. His wife Joan bore him two children, William and Hannah, and after the death of her husband she married Daniel Wing, Nov. 5, 1642. She died Jan. 31, 1664.

William Swift (2), son of William, born in England, came to the New World with his parents and settled at Sandwich, Barnstable county. He represented his town in the General Court, 1673, 1674, 1677 and 1678. He died in the latter part of 1705.

Stetson Family of Bridgewater, MA

The Stetson family of Bridgewater is one of the oldest and most prominent in that section of the State, and it has for upward of two centuries been identified with the manufacturing interests of the town, its representatives being the founders of the iron industry of Bridgewater. Especial reference is made to Capt. Abisha Stetson, who was one of the first to engage in the iron business; his son, Nahum Stetson, whose name was a household word in his native town, and who by his great foresight, enterprise and progressive ideas built up the great Bridgewater Iron Works; and the latter’s sons and grandsons, all men of substance and good citizenship.

Knowles Family of New Bedford, MA

The family bearing this name in New Bedford, where it is one of nearly one hundred years’ standing one, too, of prominence and wealth, is a branch of the ancient Knowles family of the town of Eastham, Barnstable county, this Commonwealth. Reference is made to some of the descendants of the brothers Thomas and James H. Knowles of Eastham, several of whose sons – at least two of the former and one of the latter – in their earlier manhood cast their lot with the people of New Bedford. The firm of Thomas Knowles & Co. for many years was one of the greatest engaged in the whale fishery business in New Bedford; and its members in turn have been succeeded in business by younger generations who have most worthily worn the family name and sustained its reputation; and today the name continues of record in and about the city of their birth connected prominently with many of the most extensive commercial establishments and banking institutions of the locality.

1867 Wareham Massachusetts General Directory

Adams Thomas C. saloonkeeper Alden Addison, farmer Alden Joseph A. farmer Babcock Milton, blacksmith Barker Charles, carder Barker Leonard, nailer Barker Rufus S. mason Barrows Abishai, depot master Barrows Hiram, wheelwright Barrows Hiram W. wheelwright Barrows Isaac, nailer Barrows Isaac F. nailer Barrows Wm. carpenter Bartlett John M. clerk Bartlett Lewis H. merchant Bartlett Zephaniah, hostler Barnes Elmer Bassett S. C. depot master Bassett Washington, depot master Bates Leonard Bates William, Justice of the Peace Benson Eleal, teamer Benson Elnathan Benson John W. farmer Benson Lothrop W. moulder Benson Marcus M. nailer Benson Martin V. B. clerk Benson William, cooper

History of Wareham Massachusetts

An historical sketch about Wareham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts as abstracted from the Plymouth County Directory and Historical Register of 1867. Includes a list of the men from Wareham who gave their life during the Revolutionary War.

Descendants of Samuel Sturtevant

(1) Samuel Sturtevant, the immigrant ancestor of the family, was at Plymouth, Mass., as early as May 3, 1642; married in Plymouth in 1643, to Ann (surname unknown). ISSUE: Ann, b. June 4, 1647. John, b. Oct. 17, 1650. (2) Samuel, Jr., b. April 19, 1654; d. April 21, 1736. Hannah, b. Sept. 4, 1658. John, b. Sept. 4, 1655. James, b. Feb. 11, 1660. Joseph, b. July 16. 1666. Mary, b. Dec. 7 , 1668. Lydia, b. Dec. 13, 1670. (2) Dacon Samuel Sturtevant, Jr., b. April 19, 1654: d. April 21. 1736. His will is recorded at Plymouth

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Thomas Wellman

Wellman, Samuel Thomas; mechanical engineer; born, Wareham, Mass., Feb. 5, 1847; son of Samuel K, and Mary L. Besse Wellman; educated, Norwich University, Vermont, B. S. and C. E. (hon.); married, Stoneham, Mass., Sept. 3, 1868, Julia A. Ballard; issue, Mina Bessie, Aug. 11, 1870, Addle Lena, June 1, 1872, Wm. S., Nov. 1, 1874, Holley G., May 19, 1881, Frederick S., Dec. 8, 1887; served as corporal Co. F, 1st New Hampshire Heavy Artillery, 18641865; built first open hearth furnace in United States to make steel commercially, Bay State Works, Boston, 1870; engineer and supt. Otis Steel Co., 18731889,

Agawam Tribe

Agawam Indians (Agawom) (fish-curing [place]), Hewitt. A name of frequent occurrence in south New England and on the Long Island, and by which was designated at least 3 Indian villages or tribes in Massachusetts. The most important was at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. The site was sold by the chief in 1638. Its jurisdiction included the land on Newbury River, and the tribe was a part of the Pennacook confederacy. It was almost extinct in 1658, but as late as 1726 there were still 3 families living near Wigwam hill. The second tribe or band of that name had its